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Wednesday, November 26, 2014 -- 8:51 am
Puyallup City Council Selects New City Manager
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - Full story available at http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ Read more...
Tuesday, November 25, 2014 -- 12:14 pm
Arts & Entertainment: Two artists work at synthesis between art of Japan and America
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - The Gallery at Tacoma Community College is currently hosting a two-person show in which a cultural fusion is evident. Works by Sumi painter and watercolorist Fumiko Kimura hangs on the walls while ceramic vessels by Rob Fornell occupy the middle space. Kimura and Fornell are both bicultural from an artistic standpoint. Their roots are sunken into the artistic heritage of both Japan and America. Each artist has achieved a synthesis between the artistic traditions of Japan and the urge toward invention and exploration of media that marks the arts of the Western world. (This is not to suggest that Japanese art is overly tradition-bound or that western artists are not susceptible to becoming caught up in self imposed rules as to what constitutes proper art.) Both artists capture the Japanese emphasis on the spontaneous and the gestural, Kimura in her paintings and Fornell in his crafting of vessels for the Tea Ceremony. Yet both are also constantly pushing the boundaries of their particular medium, probing for ever greater expressive potential. For Kimura, the show functions as a retrospective of a long and illustrious career. There is everything from a 1955 watercolor of the Murray Morgan Bridge to works done this year. There are examples of experiments in which Sumi ink is combined with teabags or pieces of bamboo or ink made with chimney soot. There are intimate, small works with gold leaf that draw the viewer in for a close look and there are big, swirling works in which Kimura used a broom as a brush. Born in Idaho during the great depression, Kimura went back to Japan to live for much of her childhood. She returned to the United States after WWII and went to Stadium High School and University of Puget Sound where she earned a degree in chemistry. Later she earned a masters degree in education. From childhood and continuing through college, Kimura was a painter. She learned the art of calligraphy in Japan and took art courses at UPS. In the 1980s she spent more time in Japan to further her artistic studies. Kimura has worked as a costume designer for the Tacoma City Ballet (some of the costumes are included in the show) and is the founder of the Puget Sound Sumi-e Association. Having earned his B.F.A. degree at University of Minnesota, Fornell came to the Pacific Northwest in the 1980s to get his M.F.A at University of Washington. For the next couple of decades he lived and worked in Japan, getting further training in the ceramic arts and working as an artist. Work in the show includes some of his tea bowls and other vessels made for the Tea Ceremony. These are wonderfully individualistic. Some wood fired tea bowls are formed by hand and beveled with a wire. There are a number of porcelain cups that were wheel thrown, disassembled and them pieced back together with seams and undulations. Fornell's use of black glaze with white porcelain has dramatic impact. Most fascinating is a series of hand built vases that Fornell made for Ikebana (Japane Read more...
Tuesday, November 25, 2014 -- 11:47 am
TACOMA'S HOT TICKETS Nov. 28 - Dec. 7
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - FRIDAY, NOV. 28 - BASKETBALL St. Olaf vs. Pacific Lutheran PLU Gym - 4 p.m. FRIDAY, NOV. 28 - HS FOOTBALL Toledo vs. Napavine Tacoma Dome - 4 p.m. FRIDAY, NOV. 28 - HS FOOTBALL Marysville-Pilchuck vs. Bellevue Tacoma Dome - 7:30 p.m. SATURDAY, NOV. 29 - HS FOOTBALL Eatonville vs. Cascade Christian Tacoma Dome - 10 a.m. SATURDAY, NOV. 29 - HS FOOTBALL Tumwater vs. Sedro-Woolley Tacoma Dome - 1 p.m. SATURDAY, NOV. 29 - HS FOOTBALL Neah Bay vs. Lummi Tacoma Dome - 4 p.m. SATURDAY, NOV. 29 - HS FOOTBALL Bothell vs. Newport (Bellevue) Tacoma Dome - 7:30 p.m. MONDAY, DEC. 1 - MEN'S BASKETBALL Pacific Lutheran vs. Seattle U. ShoWare Center, Kent - 7 p.m. FRIDAY, DEC. 5 - HS FOOTBALL 2B State Championship Tacoma Dome - 4 p.m FRIDAY, DEC. 5 - HS FOOTBALL 3A State Championship Tacoma Dome - 7:30 p.m. FRIDAY, DEC. 5 - MEN'S BASKETBALL UC Santa Cruz vs. Puget Sound UPS Fieldhouse - 7 p.m. FRIDAY, DEC. 5 - WOMEN'S BASKETBALL Colorado College vs. Pacific Lutheran PLU Gym - 8 p.m. SATURDAY, DEC. 6 - HS FOOTBALL 1A State Championship Tacoma Dome - 10 a.m. SATURDAY, DEC. 6 - HS FOOTBALL 2A State Championship Tacoma Dome - 1 p.m. SATURDAY, DEC. 6 - HS FOOTBALL 1B State Championship Tacoma Dome - 4 p.m. SATURDAY, DEC. 6 - HS FOOTBALL 4A State Championship Tacoma Dome - 7:30 p.m. SUNDAY, DEC. 7 - MEN'S BASKETBALL UC Santa Cruz vs. Pacific Lutheran PLU Gym - 2 p.m. Read more...
Tuesday, November 25, 2014 -- 11:40 am
Stupid Criminal of the Week
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - It is best to make sure the car you are driving is fully legal when you are driving in front of a cop car and you also just happen to have warrants out for your arrest. That is a lesson a 36-year-old man learned the hard way when two officers were patrolling Pacific Avenue on Nov. 22. They spotted the car and ran its license plate to find that the car had been sold in August, but the registration was never changed. That's illegal. The officers pulled the car over and learned that the passenger owned it and the driver was her boyfriend. They did not have money to pay for the registration change after the woman bought the car. The man also didn't have a driver's license or proof of insurance for the car. He only told the officer his name and date of birth. The officer then learned the man had a $15,000 warrant out for his arrest on a drunken driving charge. He went to jail, while his girlfriend drove the car away. Smoking marijuana might be legal, but not for teenagers blazing up a fatty while waiting for a bus at Commerce Street Transit Center on Nov. 21. The 17-year-old boy was seen discarding a cigarette at the center and was approached because of the littering charge. The smell of marijuana filled the area around him and he became aggressive when officers approached. He was arrested and searched. Officers found three glass pipes, a grinder and a plastic bag with marijuana inside. He was taken to Remann Hall. Compiled by Steve Dunkelberger Read more...
Tuesday, November 25, 2014 -- 11:36 am
Magical season ends nine yards short for Lincoln
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - A few plays cost the Lincoln Abes dearly Saturday, Nov. 22 at Lincoln Bowl and the thrill ride of a season came to a close within tripping distance of the end zone in a 28-21 heart-pounding, heartbreaking loss to second-ranked Eastside Catholic. In a game that saw the Abes outgain the Crusaders 356 to 293 in total yardage, it was a fumble, a turnover on downs and an interception that turned into 21 points for Eastside Catholic and was the game changer. The 2014 Lincoln team has to be considered the most successful Abes football team in the modern era. The Abes finished the season with an 11-1 record and led the three highest classifications in scoring a staggering 47.8 points per game. But it just wouldn't come together in the 3A state quarterfinals. Lincoln's Dehonta Hayes returned the opening kick-off out to the Lincoln 49-yard line, only to see it brought back to the 12-yard line on a holding penalty. It didn't take long for the Abes to regain their footing as Hayes took a handoff from junior quarterback Jordan Kitna and swept right and up the sideline, beating the last Crusader defender to the goal line for an electrifying 74-yard touchdown run. After a successful kick, the Abes led 7-0 with 10:42 remaining in the first quarter. Eastside Catholic (11-1) went nowhere on its opening drive and on third and 23, quarterback Harley Kirsch lofted a pass down the field that was intercepted by Lincoln sophomore Joey Sinclair. An illegal motion and intentional grounding penalty on the subsequent Lincoln drive forced the Abes to punt the ball back to the Crusaders. The Abes defense stepped up on the next drive and forced a three and out by Eastside Catholic and started their next drive at their own 27-yard line. Kitna combined three passes with a couple of runs to work the Abes down field before connecting with Hayes for a 32-yard scoring strike. Lincoln now led 14-0 with 11:52 left in the second quarter. On the next possession, Eastside Catholic again had trouble with the Lincoln defense and was forced to punt from their own 26-yard line. Punter Alex Baer boomed a 66-yarder to the Lincoln eight-yard line and Lincoln would soon find itself in trouble for the first time. After rushes by Hayes, Marcus Johnson and Jusstis Warren, Lincoln had moved the ball out to the 19-yard line and a first down. On the next play, Johnson ran the ball to the right and while fighting for another yard, fumbled the ball. The Crusaders recovered at the 25-yard line. It would take just one play for Eastside Catholic to get on the scoreboard as running back Devon Arbis-Jackson sprinted to the outside and then cut back to the middle and found the end zone. Lincoln's lead was now 14-7 with 8:39 remaining in the second quarter. The Crusaders would threaten two more times in the half, but would come away with zero points. Eastside Catholic drove the ball to the Lincoln 23-yard line, but on fourth and four, Hirsch's pass fell incomplete and Lincoln took over on downs. The A Read more...
Tuesday, November 25, 2014 -- 11:35 am
SPORTSWATCH
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - PACIFIC LUTHERAN SPLITS AT DOUG MAC - BIG GAMES ON TAP The Pacific Lutheran men's basketball team opens its 2014-15 home schedule this week, as the Lutes are set to host St. Olaf on Friday, Nov. 28 in a non-conference game at Names Family Court. Pacific Lutheran is coming off a 1-1 showing at the Doug McArthur Classic hosted by University of Puget Sound last weekend to open the season. The Lutes fell to Oglethorpe 74-58 in Friday's opener before bouncing back for a 71-59 win on Saturday over Mount Saint Mary. "We grew quite a bit between games," PLU coach Steve Dickerson said. "We're a very young team, so there are going to be blips in the radar as we go along. Basically the team equated itself very well this weekend." A PLU team that is starting two freshmen and a sophomore saw that talented youth pay off, as freshman Dylan Foreman opened his PLU career by averaging 14.5 points and 6.5 rebounds per game over the weekend and sophomore Brandon Lester led the Lutes with 19 points in Saturday's win and averaged 12 per game. Junior post Bryce Miller averaged 14 points and 12.5 rebounds, posting double-doubles in both contests. Now the Lutes turn their attention to a busy seven-day stretch that will include three games. It began Tuesday, when Northwest came to town for a 7:30 p.m. matchup. St. Olaf follows at 4 p.m. on Friday, and the Lutes will travel up to the ShoWare Center in Kent on Monday for a 7 p.m. game against NCAA Div. I Seattle University. Northwest is already a full month into its season, as the NAIA Eagles have a 5-2 record and average 68 points per game while allowing 66.3. Four Eagles are averaging double-figures in the scoring column, led by C.J. Carter's 15.3 points per game. Nemanja Grujicic has added 10.2 points per game while leading the team with 8.5 rebounds per contest and 11 total blocks. PLU is 10-8 all-time against Northwest, although the Eagles have won eight of the last 11 meetings between the teams, including the last four. Last season Northwest defeated PLU 78-71 in Kirkland, and Dickerson knows the Eagles present a challenge every time the Lutes face them. "Northwest is historically one of the best NAIA teams in the region," Dickerson said. "So that will be a big game for us. It will help us grow together as a team, and we'll be playing tremendous competition." Friday's game will mark the first time the Lutes have played St. Olaf since the 1986-87 season. The Oles are 2-0 this season, scoring 102 points in a big win over Bethany Lutheran and narrowly pulling out a one-point win over Wisconsin-Stevens Point. Ben Figini has been their top scorer with 37 points through the two games, followed by Justin Pahl's 28 total points. As a team, the Oles have shot 56.5 percent from the field while allowing opponents to make 50.5 percent of their shots. PLU is 2-0 all-time against St. Olaf. "They are usually a typical Minnesota team," Dickerson said of St. Olaf. "They have some good shooters, they're big and they'll try to Read more...
Tuesday, November 25, 2014 -- 9:54 am
Fans swoon as Fleetwood Mac, Christine McVie reunite in Tacoma
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - Fleetwood Mac had just headlined the Tacoma Dome a year and a half ago, so there was a good chance the legendary rock band would cover much of the same ground during its return engagement on Thursday, Nov. 20. Still, there was at least one compelling reason for fans to plunk down ticket money one more time: the return of singer-keyboardist Christine McVie. McVie wrote some of Fleetwood Mac's biggest hits and was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame with her band mates in 1998, right around the time she quit touring. During an appearance on the "Today" show, she blamed a fear of flying for her lengthy hiatus; and while that seems like an overly simple answer, given the band's tumultuous past, one has to wonder if ex-husband John McVie's recent bout with cancer - the reason for several show cancellations last year - had served as a wake up call, pulling her back into the fold. Whatever the reason, local fans were ecstatic to see the band's classic lineup, - also singer Stevie Nicks, singer-guitarist Lindsey Buckingham and drummer Mick Fleetwood. "Welcome back, Chris!" Nicks declared two songs into the set, drawing thunderous applause from nearly 15,000 faithful that had showed up. "She's back, and looks like she's going to stay." Like last year, Fleetwood Mac had no opening act and played for more than 2 1/2 hours, a bulk of the set drawn from the band's classic 1970s albums, "Fleetwood Mac," "Rumours" and "Tusk." There was extra emphasis on Christine McVie's contributions, of course, starting with "You Make Loving Fun." She struggled to hit a few notes in the beginning; but fans cheered her on, just thrilled to hear her sing for the first time since the Clinton Administration. McVie had shaken off her early set jitters by the time she was up for the band's breezy '80s hit "Everywhere." And eventually the evening ended on a poignant note with her sitting at the piano for "Rumours" era ballad, "Songbird." McVie's return aside, the most noteworthy improvement over last year's show was, in a word, balance. Buckingham was amped up in 2013, to the point that his unbridled energy overpowered his band mates, especially Nicks who sounded great but seemed a bit distant. Maybe she'd been a little under the weather that night because she had a much stronger stage presence on Thursday, adding hair-flailing theatrics to "Gold Dust Woman" and bringing back her trademark twirling shawl dance (absent last year) during "Rhiannon" and "Gypsy." Buckingham remains the band's most galvanizing force, though, evident during his frantic, yelping delivery of "Big Love" and the final, fretboard slapping moments of "I'm So Afraid." Nicks and Buckingham delivered the night's two best songs as an acoustic duo. At no point was the former's smoky vibrato more entrancing than during the oft-covered "Landslide," a song she dedicated to a friend who'd survived cancer. Up next was "Never Going Back Again," a breezy ditty from "Rumours" that Buckingham delivered with Read more...
Tuesday, November 25, 2014 -- 9:52 am
Broadway Center cancels Bill Cosby appearance
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - Bill Cosby's scheduled April 18 appearance at Tacoma's Pantages Theater has been canceled. Broadway Center made the announcement late last week amid accusations that the iconic comedian and actor had drugged and sexually assaulted multiple women dating back to the 1960s. "This decision is not intended to pass judgment on Mr. Cosby - that is not the business of the Broadway Center," reads a statement from Broadway Center Executive Director David Fischer. "We've been deliberate and thoughtful in making this decision, carefully considering our many relationships and legal obligations, including those with Mr. Cosby, with ticket buyers, and with our community. The Broadway Center is a non-profit organization that works diligently to strengthen our community's social fabric by building empathy, furthering education, and sharing joy. Ultimately, we were not confident in our ability to meet those objectives by proceeding with Mr. Cosby's performance in Tacoma. "In making this decision, the Broadway Center also took into consideration the financial harm we will suffer by cancelling, and the even greater financial risk of moving forward with the performance," the statement concluded. In 2006, Cosby settled a civil lawsuit filed by one accuser for an undisclosed amount. The comedian has not faced criminal charges related to any of his accusers. CNN recently interviewed Pennsylvania prosecutor Bruce Castor who said he wanted to pursue charges related to accusations made by a 31-year-old staffer for the women's basketball team at Temple University but that he lacked evidence. There has been a renewed interest in the sexual assault allegations since a clip went viral of comedian Hannibal Burress calling Cosby a rapist during one of his performances. Bill Cosby last appeared in Tacoma, at the University of Puget Sound, in February 2013. Broadway Center is offering all ticket buyers the option of getting a full refund or a ticket to another show. The venue's box office team will be reaching out to all ticket holders in the coming days to make arrangements, according to last week's announcement. Box office hours of operation are Monday through Friday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., and the phone number is (253) 591-5894 or toll-free at 1 (800) 291-7593. Read more...
Tuesday, November 25, 2014 -- 9:47 am
Nightlife
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - Friday, Nov. 28 JAZZBONES: Junkyard Jane (blues) 8 p.m., $10 B SHARP COFFEE: Live at the Auricle (spoken word) 7 p.m., NC, AA GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Nite Crew (dance) 9 p.m., NC LOUIE G'S: Story Boxx, Hard Money Saints, December in Red, A Lien Nation (hard rock) 7 p.m., $10, AA MAXWELL'S: Lance Buller Trio (jazz) 7 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Four Skins (rock) 9 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Nite Wave (new wave) 9 p.m., $5-$10 TACOMA COMEDY: Billy Wayne (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $15 UNCLE SAM'S: Hambone Blues Band (blues) 8 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 29 B SHARP COFFEE: Linda Myers Band (blues) 8 p.m., $5, AA DOYLE'S: Stephanie Ann Johnson Band (pop, soul, acoustic) 9:30 p.m., NC GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Nite Crew (dance) 9 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: Spazmatics, Mr. Pink ('80s covers) 9 p.m., $7 NEW FRONTIER: Ex-Gods, Infinite Flux (hard rock, sludge-metal) 9 p.m., $5 STONEGATE: Sass (jazz) 9 p.m., NC THE SPAR: Maia Santell & House Blend (blues, jazz) 8 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Kry (rock covers) 9 p.m., $5-$10 TACOMA COMEDY: Billy Wayne (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $15 UNCLE SAM'S: Razors & Red Flags ("pirate rock") 9 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 30 TACOMA COMEDY: Jamie Kennedy (comedy) 5, 8 p.m., $20-$30, 18+ DAWSON'S: Tim Hall Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: Bluegrass jam, 3 p.m., NC THE SPAR: Michele D'Amour & The Love Dealers (blues) 7 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Billy Hoffman and the All Star Band (classic rock) 8 p.m., NC Monday, Dec. 1 GIG SPOT: Monday Mash-Up open mic and trivia, 8 p.m., NC, AA JAZZBONES: Rockaroke (live band karaoke) 11 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: Open mic comedy with Eric "Puddin'" Lorentzen, 9 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Rob Rideout Trio (rock) 8 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Blues night, 8 p.m., NC Tuesday, Dec. 2 B SHARP COFFEE: New Artist Showcase featuring The Far Field (folk) 6:30 p.m. ANTIQUE SANDWICH CO.: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., $3, AA DAVE'S OF MILTON: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: Ha Ha Tuesday with host Ralph Porter (comedy) 8:30 p.m., $5 NEW FRONTIER: Open mic, 7 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Leanne Trevalyan (acoustic open mic) 8 p.m., NC Wednesday, Dec. 3 JAZZBONES: London Tone Music Showcase with Erick Lilavois, Science!, and Vanowen (rock) 8 p.m., $10 B SHARP COFFEE: Open mic, 7 p.m., NC, AA DAWSON'S: Linda Myers Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC NORTHERN PACIFIC: Zennith Laenid (indie-rock) 7 p.m., NC, AA STONEGATE: Dave Nichols' Hump Day Jam, 8:30 p.m., NC TOWER BAR & GRILL: Michelle Beaudry (jazz guitar) 4:30 p.m. TACOMA COMEDY: Comedy open mic, 8 p.m., NC, 18+ Thursday, Dec. 4 TACOMA COMEDY: Kristen Key (comedy) 8 p.m., $10, 18+ B SHARP COFFEE: Keith Henson Jazz Octet (jazz) 8 p.m., NC, AA CHARLEY'S: Blues jam with Richard Molina, 8 p.m., NC DAWSON'S: Billy Shew Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Billy Stoops (open mic) 8 p.m., NC Read more...
Tuesday, November 25, 2014 -- 9:41 am
Trampires fall to Cogs as Mollys continue streak
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - Bout two of Dockyard Derby Dames' ninth season didn't disappoint with five-time champions Trampires pitted against über-competitive Bellingham Roller Betties' the Cog Blockers.  Warm-up laps foreshadowed things to come with Cog Blockers showing coordinated team drills that would later wow crowds during the actual bout. The Trampires held their own for the first half, which ended 96 to 126 in favor of the guest squad. Then the 253 team tired out just as Bellingham was hitting its stride, ending the bout with a blowout 175 to 281. The Cog Blocker jammers just kept getting through Trampires' wall of muscle and hip checks with some fast wheels, tight tucks and razor-edged cornering. Skill simply won out over brawn. The second bout of the night at Pierce College Fort Steilacoom on Saturday had the Dockyard's Femme Fianna against the Marauding Mollys, an undefeated team three years running. That streak seemed set to end by the finish of the first half with the Femmes topping at the break 135 to 101. But the lead was not to last. The Mollys took the lead 177 to 176 with 15 minutes left in the second half and never gave up the standing. The bout ended 215 to 252. The next bout is slated for Jan. 10. Visit http://www.DockyardDerbyDames.com. for more information. Read more...
Tuesday, November 25, 2014 -- 9:40 am
Life Center's 'Singing Christmas Tree' returns to charm, inspire audiences
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - One of the South Sound's most beloved holiday traditions is set to mark its 52nd production as one of the largest and longest running Singing Christmas Tree productions in the country. Life Center has upped its game and is set to stage the biggest yet, and host thousands of families from around Puget Sound in what has always been an evening of holiday music, breath-taking lights and sets and an inspirational story. This year's production follows the story of Marty, the owner of The Brookdale Zoo. He is suddenly faced with the prospect of having to shut down this beloved town icon for lack of funds and he turns to Jesus to keep his hopes alive. Somehow, he must come up with a ton of cash in just a few short weeks to keep his father's dream alive and save the zoo. There's a huge problem, though - nobody goes to the zoo in the cold of winter and Miss French, the town's new bank manager, must have the payment no later than Christmas. All seems lost until Marty gets an idea just crazy enough to work. Will Marty and his assistant Hank be able to pull it off before Christmas? Will Miss French use her authority to shut down the zoo? In addition to being highly entertaining, the story has a wonderful message for this time of year and all the year through: in the midst of his difficult questions, Marty calls out to Jesus and discovers that there is hope. There is always hope, even when hope is all you have. Life Center's Singing Christmas Tree started in 1963 and has grown to now include 100,000 holiday lights and almost 200 performers and 100 back-stage volunteers. Performances sell out more often than not, so don't expect to get tickets at the door. General admission seats are $5 with reserved seating available for $15 to $25. Visit http://www.singingtreetacoma.com or call (253) 761-2147 for more information. Life Center is located at 1717 S. Union Ave. Performances run Dec. 6 to Dec. 23. Read more...
Tuesday, November 25, 2014 -- 9:38 am
Bark in the holidays at Bark-N-Buddies
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - Edgewood's Bark-N-Buddies Doggie Daycare will host a Winter Open House from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Dec. 7, for customers and would-be customers to see the facilities and meet the staff at a party filled with holiday cheer. The event will include photos with Santa, furry friend treats, Snoop Dogg Mobile Dog Grooming and a presentation by Gretchen Jannenga from Great Dog Canine Education Center. Rescue groups will also be on hand to offer information about pet adoption and other resources. Dogs and their families can get a tour of the facility to see if it is a fit for doggy daycare needs. All dogs older than six months must be spayed or neutered and be current on their Bordetella, rabies and distemper shots. Bark-N-Buddies Doggie Daycare offers a spacious facility that was designed to provide a safe place for your buddy to train, exercise, socialize, play doggy games and just have fun. The staff offers the ideal place for your buddy to stay active and engaged throughout the day while you are doing human things during the day. Being alone most of the day can leave any pet longing for some company and activity. Bark-N-Buddies will give your pet the treat of companionship and exercise while you tend to your busy schedule. Bark-N-Buddies Doggie Daycare is located at 3121 Meridian Ave. E. Edgewood. Call (253) 446-6611 or visit www.bark-n-buddies.com for more information. Read more...
Tuesday, November 25, 2014 -- 9:31 am
Tacoma's Toy Rescue Mission
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - Any grown-up who has lost their faith in the existence of Santa Claus need only visit the Toy Rescue Mission in Tacoma. There, you will meet the charming and personable Martha Davis and while she doesn't have a white beard or a belly that shakes like a bowl full of jelly, she is the embodiment of Saint Nick himself in her generous heart and soul. With a team of volunteer "elves" in the Mission's toy workshops, Davis drives the sleigh as executive director of the Mission with just one pure goal in mind: to make Christmas bright for thousands of local children who otherwise would have nothing on that blessed day. Best of all, shoppers pay nothing - everything is free at the Toy Rescue Mission. Housed in a plain building at 607 S. Winifred St. that you'd be likely to drive right past without even noticing, it's a very different scene inside, as the non-profit Mission has been buzzing with activity 365 days a year for 24 years supplying for kids' birthday parties, making Easter baskets, filling backpacks at back-to-school time and preparing for the Mission's busiest time of year - Christmas. And business is booming - the Mission went from serving 50 children a year in its beginnings to serving 7,800 children last year and that number is guaranteed to keep growing. "It's a very unique place in that it's the only place like it in the United States," Davis said. "We have done the research and there is no other place like this that is open year-round." This is how the Toy Rescue Mission works: Taking gently used toys donated by adults whose children and/or grandchildren have outgrown them, volunteers thoroughly clean and sanitize each and every toy, refurbish them to full working order - including fresh batteries with every toy that needs them - then a commercial shrink-wrap machine is used to package them up all neat and tidy. "We make it look like new," Davis said, and she has high standards when it comes to what goes out on the shelves for shoppers. "I won't give a child anything I wouldn't give to mine." The variety of items filling the Toy Rescue Mission is incredible to behold and all totally organized, with room after room packed wall-to-wall with dolls and all the accessories, games, puzzles, books, building toys, Fischer Price/Playskool, riding toys, arts and craft supplies, stuffed animals (Mission volunteers have processed 9,000 stuffed animals this year) - you name it and the Mission probably has it. The shopping rooms are designed like those in Target and Walmart, with toys displayed on rows of shelving in an orderly presentation that shoppers can browse through with ease. For the Christmas season, the Toy Rescue Mission is open Dec. 3-22, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily. "We average 150 families a day for 12 days in the month of December," Davis said, "and of those 150 families last year it was 5,543 children we served in one month in 12 days and all with volunteers." The only requirement is that the child has to be receiving DSHS benefits in Read more...
Tuesday, November 25, 2014 -- 9:27 am
Sound Transit preps for bond package
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - Sound Transit is shifting into a higher gear as it preps its long-range plan of projects to cut congestion around its tri-county Puget Sound service area. Previous bond packages will fund the current list of projects through 2023, but the region is growing faster than those projects can handle. Transit buses and trains already shuttle 100,000 people to and from work, classes, appointments and shopping centers each day. That ridership is projected to grow to 350,000 in 2030 following the completion of more than 30 miles of light rail expansions that are already in the works. That service load will only increase since Puget Sound is expected to grow by a million people by 2040. Planning for those new riders takes years of forecasting, developing funding options and designing routes. That means talks for future projects that won't happen for decades has already started, including more than 12,000 people commenting about growth patterns and transit demands in the years to come. A draft long-range plan is under review, with a decision in December. Expect more talk about Sound Transit 3, a $15 billion package voters will be asked to consider as early as November 2016. The package could likely include a mix of property taxes, vehicle license tab increases and other hikes, if lawmakers allow for Sound Transit to collect more than the current tax lid allows. One fundraising option is to start charging businesses in Snohomish, King and Pierce counties up to $2 per worker. Sound Transit already has the green light to ask voters to start collecting the tax, but that has never been included in previous packages and couldn't cover the full slate of projected projects. Neither would the creation of Local Improvement Districts to fund specific projects. Whatever the specific tax and fee formula, the target is $15 billion over 15 years on yet-to-be determined projects. Voters approved a larger package in 2008 that created a host of projects, including the expansion of Tacoma Link that is under development to connect the current system up to the Hilltop neighborhood. "For the Sound Transit Board to be able to put a measure before voters in 2016, the Legislature must first grant local authority to the agency," said Sound Transit Board Chair and King County Executive Dow Constantine. "Once the state provides flexible funding tools, the board can move to decide on a package of specific high-capacity projects, and the means by which voters can choose to fund them." In adopting its state legislative agenda for 2015, the board is set to ask lawmakers for a range of options to fund a transportation package that would then be considered by local voters. On the table now is a property tax of up to 25 cents for each $1,000 of assessed valuation. That's $75 annually for a $300,000 house. A sales tax increase of 0.5 percent and the reauthorization of vehicle tab fees of up to 0.8 percent of vehicle value, $80 annually on a $10,000 vehicle, are also under discussion. Read more...
Tuesday, November 25, 2014 -- 9:26 am
Hotel set for downtown site
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - The long-standing trouble of Tacoma lacking downtown hotel rooms to house guests attending large conventions at the Tacoma Convention and Trade Center is set to end with city officials approving plans for the private development of a two-tower high-rise that will have 16 floors of 300 hotel rooms in one tower and 17 floors of up to 220 condominiums in the other. The whole project is likely to cost $150 million. The site of the project, situated between the convention center and the University of Washington-Tacoma campus, is currently a city-owned parking lot near South 17th Street and Broadway and valued at about $6 million. Each tower will have its own distinctive entrance with up to 50,000 square feet of retail and restaurant offerings on the ground floors. Plans call for the hotel to have a direct connection with the convention center's pre-function area. Seattle-based Yareton Investment and Management is proposing the development, which will largely be funded by Chinese-connected investors through a foreign investment program administered through the State Department. The program allows foreign investors to fast track visa applications if they finance job-creating projects. Yareton is also behind a similar hotel project in Des Moines. It was one of five developers who submitted proposals to the city's call for projects earlier this year. Three of the other proposals sought subsidies while the fourth wanted use of the convention center parking garage for hotel guests. Construction could start as early as next fall. The hotel could open in the summer of 2017, while the condos could open a year later. Read more...
Tuesday, November 25, 2014 -- 9:25 am
Be Well - Inside and Out
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - If I had to speculate about how evolution makes advances in a race or species I would chose to think that our ability to utilize oxygen would improve our intelligence. Every cell in our bodies depends on burning this chemical, especially the brain. The brain has a special relationship with oxygen, getting the majority portion of every breath. However my speculation tells me that this "60 percent" that goes to the brain is not even nearly enough for it to perform its duties. We can only use 10 percent of our brain based on the latest accepted scientific information. Understanding that nature doesn't give us anything it doesn't expect us to use, eventually we shall be able to use our entire brain but not before we get better at using more lung space and therefore more oxygen consumption. We humans perform so poorly in breathing that by the time we reach our golden years we have numerous respiratory problems stemming from being "a shallow breather." (I read it somewhere and I believe it. ) If you can visualize the average human breath intake is about one cup of oxygen, our lung capacity is more like two quarts. Shaky proof would be if you look at the healthiest countries. In Scandinavia the population spends lots of time outdoors exercising. The higher oxygen content in their blood means more health in their lives. There is much scientific evidence, and my personnel opinion, to support these conclusions. Some of the Tacomans that I have helped in my years at the Tacoma Mall for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), sleep apnea and sinus conditions have generally improved their breathing and, ensuing, their overall health.  The aging process seems to challenge us to breathe more to stay healthy and on the go, able to perform everyday routines. Over time our blood loses the ability to carry oxygen, thereby suffocating every cell in our bodies, and especially the brain. On the reverse side, if we start to teach our very young to breathe deeper and longer we might just nudge the evolutionary process into speeding up change and the ability to use more of the "gray matter" God gave us. We all might one day be able to use mental telepathy and move objects without touching them, overcome crime and warfare and living longer with less disease. J. Steven Hannah owns and operates Executive Massage in the Tacoma Mall. Call (253) 756-0876. Read more...
Tuesday, November 25, 2014 -- 9:23 am
Cold Case: Girl's 1961 disappearance possibly linked to Ted Bundy
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - Is a little girl who disappeared in 1961 haunting the women's dormitory at the University of Puget Sound? I couldn't find anyone last week to interview who has actually seen her, but it's a well-known ghost story in Tacoma and another added layer to the mystery that surrounds her disappearance - a vanishing that includes a possible link to serial killer Ted Bundy. Washington's Most Wanted Cold Case Correspondent Parella Lewis talked with Detective Gene Miller and national best-selling author Rebecca Morris about the case. Morris wrote the book "Ted and Ann." "There was a storm that night. It was just before Labor Day weekend. It rained very hard for Tacoma and there was a lot of wind, and power went out in certain neighborhoods," said Morris. It was Aug. 31, 1961. Ann Marie Burr and her family were hunkered down for the night. "It was kind of the last hurrah for the children in the family. Ann was the oldest of four. She was eight and a half and a couple of the kids slept in the basement in their fort, but Ann and her little sister stayed in their bedrooms upstairs," Morris continued. Ann's mother, Beverly, chained and locked the front door before going to bed, but when she woke up the next morning her little girl was gone. Morris explains, "The front door of the house, which was locked with the chain from the inside, was standing wide open and there was a window in the living room that had been opened from the outside. There was a bench pulled up to the window outside where somebody had stood on the bench and opened the window. "The bench that was leaned up against the side of the building subsequently was determined to have a partial palm print on it. There was a shoe print evidence near the point of entry. There was also a small quantity of biological evidence left at the point of entry as well, believed to be at least potentially from the suspect." Morris continued, "The best suspects in 1961 were a high school neighbor boy who was two houses away from Ann's house and police questioned him a couple of times, and a couple of bean pickers who had come up from Oregon to look for work." There wasn't enough evidence to charge them. Ann's disappearance faded into memory until years later when police learned of Ted Bundy. He was just 14 years old when Ann disappeared and lived two miles away. Bundy also had an uncle who lived in her neighborhood and, according to a family friend, Ted knew Ann. "She says that Ann used to be in the group of kids that sometimes played together, and that Ted was around and that Ann liked to follow Ted around when he got his newspapers ready for delivery in the afternoon," Morris explains. Ann's mother wrote to Bundy asking if he kidnapped her daughter. Time and time again, he denied it, writing, "I do not know what happened to your daughter and had nothing to do with her disappearance." However, an interview he gave shortly before his execution cast grave doubts on his claim. "Speaking in the third person Read more...
Monday, November 24, 2014 -- 4:06 pm
SANTA ARRIVES AT POINT DEFIANCE ZOO & AQUARIUM
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - Full story available at http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ Read more...
Monday, November 24, 2014 -- 10:48 am
Tacoma Food Bank Giving Away Free Turkeys With All The Fixings. 
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - The Eloise Cooking Pot Food Bank (http://www.themadf.org) has announced they will be helping disadvantaged families in the Pierce County - Tacoma area of Washington this year to celebrate Thanksgiving with a complete turkey dinner. These turkey dinners will be given away this Friday, November 21, 2014, from Noon until 5pm, from their location at 3543 E. Mckinley Avenue in Tacoma, Washington. The Turkey Dinner Giveaway was made possible from the generous donations of sponsors such as the Puyallup Tribe, and Walmart. The Eloise Cooking Pot Food Bank program is a part of the Making A Difference Foundation. The Making a Difference Foundation is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization which was founded by Ahndrea L. Blue in 2003 with a mission of Making A Difference in the lives of others one person at a time by helping them acquire the most basic of human needs: food, housing, encouragement and opportunity. The Eloise's Cooking Pot Food Bank provides quality food to the communities of pierce county, Washington. In 2013, they served over 100,000 needy clients by providing them with up to 1 million pounds of food. The food bank is named after Ahndrea Blue's grandmother, Eloise, a woman of humble means who would generously share whatever food she had by providing a hot meal to anyone who was in need. To donate or get involved, or just for more information, visit http://www.themadf.org/. Read more...
Friday, November 21, 2014 -- 2:08 pm
Broadway Center cancels upcoming Bill Cosby appearance
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - Full story available at http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ Read more...




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