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Wednesday, October 29, 2014 -- 2:11 pm
Stupid Criminal of the Week
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - Even experienced drivers sometimes make mistakes when it comes to making sure their cars are good to go. Everyone is guilty of driving a few miles with the emergency brake on at least once in their lives. One criminal was a little less aware, forgetting to turn on his headlights in the middle of the night on Oct. 24 while driving down Cushman Avenue. A police officer noticed the suspiciously stealthy car and pulled the driver and two passengers over. It turns out headlights weren't the only essential the driver was forgetting, as the criminal admitted he didn't have insurance, and neither he nor the other two passengers were wearing seatbelts, truly living on the edge of danger. When the officer ran the names of the three people in the car, one of the passengers even had a warrant for theft. The passenger was transported to Fife jail, and the driver was given citations for driving without headlights on a motor vehicle and operating a vehicle without insurance. Some drunken drivers are identified by their reckless driving on the road, others by their inability to even make it out of the parking lot. This was the case on Oct. 24, when a UWT school patrol noticed a car stuck in a turnabout outside the school on Commerce Street. After attempting to exit three times, the driver appeared to give up and kept his car idling. Police arrived on the scene when the patrol officer approached the man in the car and noticed the smell of booze. When officers asked the man to get out of the car, they found that he could barely stand on his own. After failing the "touch your nose" test six times, police transported the man to Tacoma Police headquarters, where he blew a .198 and .191 on the BAC test, more than double the legal limit. He was then taken to Fife jail without incident. Compiled by Derek Shuck Read more...
Wednesday, October 29, 2014 -- 12:38 pm
Arts & Entertainment: Two UPS art professors dazzle the eye with 2D works at Kittredge
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - University of Puget Sound's Kittredge Gallery is currently showing work by two of its associate professors of art: Janet Marcavage and Elise Richman. Entitled "Ripple and Unfold: Recent Work by Janet Marcavage and Elise Richman," the show consists of the work of both artists (paintings, drawings, prints and photos) shuffled together throughout the gallery. Marcavage does complex, silkscreen prints of striped fabrics that are draped and folded or piled up. Richman is a painter who, in the current series, explores ripples made by droplets on the surface of water. The result is a show that dazzles the eye with colorful stripes, circles and spirals. One might fancy, on first glance, that this is a show of "op art" or "pop art." Both artists should be well known to Tacoma art viewers. Marcavage has been featured in Woolworth Windows and had work in "Ink This!" - the show of Northwest prints that recently came to a close at Tacoma Art Museum. Richman's works have been exhibited around town as well. She is the 2014 winner of the Greater Tacoma Community Foundation's Foundation of Art Award. While distinctive, the works of the two artists reside in harmony with one another. The works have a geometric, abstract nature yet they are rooted in observed phenomena. Marcavage is fascinated in the "topography" of textile patterns as they take on the forms of objects over which they are draped: a table, a girl or a laundry heap. The simplicity of the repeated pattern of the textile is countered by the complexity of the various folds and curves of the cloth. Her multicolored silkscreen prints of these configurations of textiles are unfailingly attractive to the eye. Richman approaches painting in the spirit of experimentation and discovery of the Renaissance. Her studio takes on the nature of a laboratory as she experiments with the ways in which various materials flow together. She explores a variety of pigments and binding media (including natural pigments). For the current series, Richman used a wave tank and shot photos of drops hitting the water. Richman's contribution to the show includes charcoal drawings and big, textured paintings in dry pigments that are mixed with walnut oil to form rich, thick blends of moody color often with a crackle finish. There is also a charming set of small panels done with thin washes of acrylic and ink (almost pastel colors) and given a glossy finish. Both artists have a cerebral, philosophical approach to their work, yet the results possess a punch that draws viewers in. The show includes a batch of the pencil drawings that shows the starting point for Marcavage's prints. There are also some of the murky and mysterious digital photos that have come out of Richman's studio experiments with the wave tank. "Ripple and Unfold" runs through Nov. 15. For further information visit http://www.pugetsound.edu/Kittredge or call (253) 879-3701. Read more...
Wednesday, October 29, 2014 -- 8:51 am
Local Restaurants
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - Tacomans looking for a bit of authentic Mexican food can find their way to Anahuac Mexican Restaurant, located at 9002 Pacific Ave., for a south of the border taste combined with friendly service. Anahuac is an area in Mexico that was given, it is believed, to the Aztecs by God and manager Arcelia Ramirez hopes that in Tacoma, the name can be a beacon for Mexican culture as well. With dishes from all over the country, Anahuac serves as a cornucopia of Mexican food. "This is our theme, to get people to understand our culture's food," Ramirez said, "and to call Mexicans here to remember their culture." Anahuac houses a banquet room for special events. Up to 100 people can revel in Anahuac's fine Mexican cuisine for birthdays, anniversaries or any other type of celebration. Anahuac offers all the classics including enchiladas and supreme burritos, but for a little bit spicier of a dish, one of Ramirez' favorites is the Pollo a la Naranja con Chipotle, orange chicken with a kick of chipotle sauce to get your tongue burning. If you're still hungry after your authentic meal, try several desserts including deep fried vanilla ice cream and homemade flan. Anahuac features a full bar, including traditional Mexican margaritas with flavor choices of strawberry, banana, peach, kiwi, raspberry, blackberry, mango coconut, guava, lemon, passion fruit, Bahama Mama, pomegranate, melon and pineapple. Anahuac also serves a variety of imported beers including Sol, Tecate, Bohemia, Corona, Corona Light, Negra Modelo, Modelo Especial, Pacifico, XX Lager, XX Amber, Heineken and Miller Chill. Domestic beers include Bud Light, Budweiser, MGD, Michelob Ultra, Coors Light and Miller Lite. Anahuac participates in the fine tradition of taco Tuesdays - tacos for $1 every Tuesday during their happy hour from 3-6 p.m. and 9 p.m. to close which happens to be at 10 p.m. on Tuesdays. Anahuac is open Monday through Thursday from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m., Friday and Saturday from 8 a.m. to 11 p.m. and Sunday from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. For more information call (253) 538-7195. Read more...
Wednesday, October 29, 2014 -- 8:50 am
SPORTSWATCH
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - TCC TABS CHRISTY MARTIN AS NEW WOMEN'S BASKETBALL COACH Christy Martin joins Titan athletics as head coach of the women's basketball team for the 2014-15 season. Martin comes to TCC from Blue Mountain Community College in Pendleton, Ore., where she spent six years turning a struggling program into the most successful women's basketball program in BMCC history. In the 2013-14 season, BMCC took third in the NWAC tournament despite losing a top-scoring player to injury. Originally from Spokane, Martin is familiar with Tacoma from high school State 4A tournaments, in which she participated both as a player and as an assistant coach. "Having the opportunity to work in a bigger pond with a larger array of local talent was a big draw to Tacoma," said Martin. "TCC athletics are rich in tradition; I am excited and motivated to help bring Titan WBB back to prominence in the NWAC." Martin believes in developing strong student-athletes who hold themselves to high academic standards and give back to the community. "My fundamental vision will always be excellence, both in the classroom, the community and during competition. Finding new and different mechanisms to achieving this is part of the challenge. The end goal is producing a program that our Titan community will be proud of." OFFENSIVE EXPLOSION LEADS TO PLU BLOWOUT ON THE GRIDIRON Willamette took the opening kickoff and drove down the field for an early lead, but from that point on it was all Pacific Lutheran as the Lutes broke a 44-year-old program record with 686 yards of total offense in a 56-14 Northwest Conference football victory over the Bearcats Saturday, Oct. 25 at Sparks Stadium. Going against a dangerous power rushing team following a disappointing road loss last weekend, the Lutes rebounded in the most dominant way possible on Saturday. Willamette picked up 75 yards on its first drive to take a 7-0 lead and added 64 yards on its final drive late in the fourth quarter, but the PLU defense limited the Bearcats to 151 yards in between as the Lutes out-gained the Bearcats 686 to 290. Northwest Conference leading rusher Dylan Jones broke a 57-yard run on the third play from scrimmage as Willamette opened the game with five consecutive running plays leading to a touchdown. The Lutes responded with a five-play, 75-yard drive of their own capped by a 47-yard scoring pass from Dalton Ritchey to Kyle Warner to tie it up less than five minutes into the game. From there the PLU defense stepped up and the offense never let up as the Lutes scored on every drive except their final possession before halftime, when a missed field goal sent PLU into the break, up 28-7. The Lutes came right back out in the second half and scored a touchdown on their first drive of the second half before a fourth-down stop in their next possession included the only missed third-down attempt of the day for PLU, not counting quarterback kneels at the end of the game. Officially, PLU converted 11 of 13 third-down att Read more...
Wednesday, October 29, 2014 -- 8:47 am
Tacoma Welcomes Bass Pro Shop
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - Tacomans living by Hosmer Street may have noticed a slight influx of traffic over the past couple of weeks. This may be due to the 53,000 people that flooded the area to get to the brand new Bass Pro Shop, located at 7905 S. Hosmer St. The outdoor sporting store's grand opening attracted thousands from all around the state, and for good reason. Bass Pro Shop celebrated the occasion by bringing in several celebrities for autograph sessions on its Oct. 22 opening night; the line to meet them wrapped a whole wall of the store. Guests included Steven Hauschka, kicker for the Seattle Seahawks; Jeanette Lee (a.k.a. "The Black Widow"), star of "America's Billiards;" Cody Herman, the host of the "Day One Outdoors" television show; Steven Rinella, the host of "Meat Eater" as seen on the Sportsman Channel; Duane Inglin, co-host of Northwest Wild Country radio; Timmy Horton, Bass Pro Shops/NITRO pro staff member; Lance Thornton, RedHead pro hunting team member and U.S.A. Para Archery national team member; Bob Foulkrod, RedHead pro hunting team member; Doug Koenig, competitive shooter and "World's Best All Around Shooter;" and Allyson Rowe, 2014 Miss Washington U.S.A. Oct. 22 was also a night of conservation for the store. For every dollar spent, 50 cents was donated to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife's Youth Outdoor Initiatives Program and Wonders of Wildlife, the American national fish and wildlife museum, with Toyota Motor Sales and Johnny Morris Conservation Creel of the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation matching donations. The celebration lasted for the rest of the week, with the first 200 customers on Thursday receiving a gift card of a random value for the store. Early customers on Friday gained a Columbia beanie, while Saturday's early prize was a Yakima Spin 'n Glow lure. Finally on Sunday, the first 200 customers received a Bass Pro Shop tervis tumbler. Bass Pro Shops are known for their large selection of gear for fishing, hunting, camping, boating and marine activities. Bass Pro Shops also offer equipment for hiking, backpacking, outdoor cooking and more. Shoppers will find outdoor apparel for men, women and children along with a selection of outdoor, casual and athletic footwear. A gift and nature center includes a wide variety of outdoor-related items from lamps and dishes to bird feeders and furniture. "We're an outdoor store geared toward family," General Manager Ken Bruhn said. "We provide what they're looking for." If outdoors activities aren't your cup of tea, Tacoma's Bass Pro Shop is much more than just a retail store. If you're looking for a night out with friends, try the bowling alley included in the store. If you have trouble finding it, it's right next to Uncle Buck's Fishbowl and Grill, a family restaurant, which just happens to be a great spot to catch the big game every Sunday. Bass Pro Shop also houses a giant fish bowl for customers to check out, making it a hybrid outdoor sporting store-bowling alley Read more...
Wednesday, October 29, 2014 -- 8:11 am
TACOMA'S HOT TICKETS OCT. 30 - NOV. 09
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - THURSDAY, OCT. 30 - HS FOOTBALL Rainier vs. Chief Leschi Chief Leschi Stadium - 7 p.m. FRIDAY, OCT. 31 - VOLLEYBALL Lewis & Clark vs. Pacific Lutheran PLU Gymnasium - 7 p.m. FRIDAY, OCT. 31 - HS FOOTBALL Gig Harbor vs. Bellarmine Prep Bellarmine HS - 7 p.m. FRIDAY, OCT. 31 - HS FOOTBALL Curtis vs. Stadium Stadium Bowl - 7 p.m. FRIDAY, OCT. 31 - HS FOOTBALL Foss vs. Lincoln Lincoln Bowl - 7 p.m. FRIDAY, OCT. 31 - HS FOOTBALL North Thurston vs. Mt. Tahoma Mt. Tahoma Stadium - 7 p.m. FRIDAY, OCT. 31 - HS FOOTBALL Franklin Pierce vs. Washington Franklin Pierce Stadium - 7 p.m. FRIDAY, OCT. 31 - HS FOOTBALL Fife vs. Clover Park Harry Lang Stadium - 7 p.m. SATURDAY, NOV. 01 - INDOOR SOCCER Northwest Indoor Soccer Invitational Tacoma Soccer Center - 3 p.m. SATURDAY, NOV. 01 - COLLEGE FOOTBALL Pacific Lutheran vs. Puget Sound UPS Baker Stadium - 1 p.m. SATURDAY, NOV. 01 - VOLLEYBALL Pacific vs. Pacific Lutheran PLU Gymnasium - 7 p.m. SATURDAY, NOV. 01 - HS FOOTBALL Tacoma Baptist vs. Life Christian Harry Lang Stadium - 7 p.m. WEDNESDAY, NOV. 05 - VOLLEYBALL Puget Sound vs. Pacific Lutheran PLU Gymnasium - 7 p.m. FRIDAY, NOV. 07 - WOMEN'S SOCCER Pacific vs. Puget Sound UPS East Field - 11 a.m. FRIDAY, NOV. 07 - HS VOLLEYBALL Lincoln vs. 3A Districts Auburn Mountainview - 2 p.m./5:30 p.m. FRIDAY, NOV. 07 - HS VOLLEYBALL Bellarmine vs. 4A Districts Kentwood HS - 4:15 p.m./8 p.m. SATURDAY, NOV. 08 - HS VOLLEYBALL Lincoln vs. 3A Districts Auburn Mountainview - TBA SATURDAY, NOV. 08 - HS VOLLEYBALL Bellarmine vs. 4A Districts Kentwood HS - 2 p.m./ 6 p.m. SATURDAY, NOV. 08 - WOMEN'S SOCCER Lewis & Clark vs. Puget Sound UPS East Field - 11 a.m. SATURDAY, NOV. 08 - COLLEGE FOOTBALL Linfield vs. Puget Sound UPS Baker Stadium - 1 p.m. SATURDAY, NOV. 08 - COLLEGE FOOTBALL Whitworth vs. Pacific Lutheran Sparks Stadium, Puyallup - 1 p.m. SATURDAY, NOV. 09 - MEN'S SOCCER Pacific Lutheran vs. Puget Sound UPS East Field - 1:30 p.m. Read more...
Wednesday, October 29, 2014 -- 8:08 am
Be Well - inside & out
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - It's no secret what negative effects sensory overload can have on our daily lives. With kids, jobs, schedules, noise, traffic and so much more to contend with, not only do our mind and spirit suffer but our physical body as well can grow sore and painful from shouldering the demands of the day. It only stands to logic then, that at the other end of the spectrum there is relief - the deliberate reduction of stimuli, sometimes technically referred to as "sensory deprivation," to induce a calm, peaceful and healing meditative state that can carry into your daily routine. In Tacoma, City of Destiny Float & Massage is the go-to place for those seeking respite from the constant bombardment and stress from the outside world. Step into one of their 7-foot by 5 ˝-foot float basins and you'll come away feeling renewed and refreshed like never before. The secret is in the 1,200 pounds of Epsom salt that is dissolved into 10 inches of water, creating a unique solution three times denser than the Dead Sea. As you lie on your back and float effortlessly at the surface in a sound and light reduced environment, the skin-temperature water allows for weightlessness in blissful peace and quiet. Without visual or audio stimulation, your body will more fully relax. Your ears stay just below the water, so noise won't be able to reach you. There is no clock, so nothing pulls for your attention. You can let go of scheduling, the phone, interruptions, etc...which is why floating is really about everything you won't be doing. With the holidays approaching, giving the gift of relaxation is easy when purchasing a gift certificate from City of Destiny Float and Massage, as they offer gift certificates for all modalities, either in the store or online at http://www.destinyfloats.com for floating, Swedish massage or vibroacoustic massage. If you know someone who is hard to shop for, just remember that everyone benefits from more relaxation in his or her life. Marca Ouida founded City of Destiny Float & Massage, located at 406 E. 26th St. "I started floating in March of 2013 and from my first float I fell in love with it," Ouida said. "I became more relaxed and also more energetic. It felt like I caught up on years of sleep. I started floating regularly - twice a week and for double sessions." She discovered that one hour to 90 minutes of floating makes for a complete experience, so she offers these timed sessions at City of Destiny Float & Massage. "Some people have grown so used to living with minor aches and pains that once they float and those are removed, they're astounded at how much better they feel. From this experience, people come away feeling really good and really healthy. "Usually it's not the first float that a person will experience an 'aha' moment with floating," Ouida said. "Generally, it takes three or four floats to achieve an 'aha' moment or a more pronounced meditative state." Ouida noted that the effects of floating are a purely individu Read more...
Wednesday, October 29, 2014 -- 8:05 am
Bulletin Board
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - 'DICKENSIAN' SERIES CONCLUDES WITH DEXTER GORDON The annual Dickens Festival will complete with its final presentation in the speakers' series "Dickensian: Poverty in the 21st Century" with Dr. Dexter Gordon, a professor of African American studies and communications at University of Puget Sound. On Thursday, Nov. 6 at 7 p.m. Gordon will speak on the subject of "Poverty, Race and the Search for the American Dream" at King's Books, 218 St. Helens Ave. Once again Steve and Kristi Nebel will begin the event with a performance of two original songs related to the theme of the series. They play guitar and bass to accompany their vocals. The series was begun this year and arranged by Steve Nebel, one of the Dickens Festival organizers. Says Nebel, "The notion behind this series is that an effort could be made to associate 'Dickensian,' as commonly defined by a period in time when there were no social safety nets in England, with American 21st century poverty." The 10th annual Dickens Festival at Stadium takes place Dec. 5-7. It was inspired and originated 10 years ago by Frances and Mario Lorenz, the chairpersons of the organizing committee. For more information visit the newly revised website, http://www.dickensfestival.net/. Charles Dickens was the first great urban novelist in England who used fiction to criticize economic, social, and moral abuses in the Victorian era. In a letter to his friend Wilkie Collins dated Sept. 6, 1858, Dickens wrote: "Everything that happens [...] shows beyond mistake that you can't shut out the world; that you are in it, to be of it; that you get yourself into a false position the moment you try to sever yourself from it; that you must mingle with it, and make the best of it, and make the best of yourself into the bargain." 15 NOW TACOMA INVITES COMMUNITY TO WEEKLY ACTION GROUP The weekly action group for 15 Now Tacoma, the movement to bring a $15 an hour minimum wage to Tacoma, invites the public to learn about the campaign on Nov. 1, 4-5:30 p.m. at First United Methodist Church, 621 Tacoma Ave. S. (around back). Childcare will be provided. Just e-mail 15nowtacoma253@gmail.com to let the meeting organizers know that you are bringing your child(ren). For more information, contact Sarah at (253) 973-8153. Go to 15 Now Tacoma on Facebook to stay updated on events. WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT OPTING OUT Parents and Friends for Tacoma Public Schools (PFTPS), a community group dedicated to strengthening our public education system, is presenting information on the process of opting students out of standardized testing. This event will take place Thursday, Nov. 6 in Room 103, located in McIntyre Hall on the University of Puget Sound campus in Tacoma. Doors will open at 5:45 p.m. with the presentation beginning at 6 p.m. If excessive testing concerns you, and you have noticed changes in your child's behavior as testing has increased, please plan to attend. Bring your questions. Bring your friends, too. Parents Read more...
Tuesday, October 28, 2014 -- 8:47 am
Candlelight Vigil Planned for Friday
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - Full story available at http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ Read more...
Monday, October 27, 2014 -- 3:00 pm
Urban Myths, Halloween Candy and Marijuana
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - Halloween is fast approaching. While parents always know to check for any tampering the candy their little trick-or-treaters bring home, there is a new danger to be aware of this year, the start of the Urban Myth.  Some police agencies around the country are warning parents to make sure that when their little Elsa, Yoda or Spiderman is finished going door to door, that they didn't come home with a marijuana-infused trick-or-treat candy. In reality it should just be called marijuana-infused candy. Don't believe this myth! Just because Washington legalized marijuana does not mean people will intentionally give away infused candy to kids this Halloween. It's too expensive, hard to get and users of these products are pretty laid back and not generally terrifying in nature. The real danger lies in a child picking up marijuana edibles that have been left out in the open or given to them by friends. It happened recently in Pierce County. A high school girl brought pot brownies and handed them out to unsuspecting students. The real warning should be about talking to our kids all year long to educate them on the dangers of eating a marijuana cookie or infused candy. These edibles look the same and the reason is because they are. The products you see are store bought candy, suckers, gummy bears and other items taken out of the package and sprayed with a liquid substance that has been extracted from marijuana. The spray is infused into the candy items and repackaged. Sometimes the packaging is very clear that it's not the commercial brand and is infused, but sometimes it's not - the packaging looks a lot like the real thing to a child. There is no way a child, parent or even the police can tell without testing the candy whether a product is infused or not. Use common sense and toss unrecognizable items or open packages your kids receive this Halloween and you will be fine. Just like our parents worried about razors in apples during the trick-or-treat scares in the 70's, the days of homemade treats given to neighborhood kids are long gone. Sorry to the sweet lady who used to make us caramel apples for Halloween! I don't believe that anyone would intentionally give these items to children. Even the scares back in the 70's and 80's all turned out to be an urban myth. There were no razorblades, pins or poison in Halloween candy. There was no Boogeyman. Let's not create a new urban legend in a attempt to take Halloween away from the kids, and me if I'm really honest here!  It's crucial that consumers of these marijuana products keep their stash out of the reach of children and be responsible users. This link shows you how hard it is for anyone to tell the difference between regular candy and infused candy. Be safe and have a Happy Halloween! Read more...
Monday, October 27, 2014 -- 2:58 pm
UPDATE: Alleged killer spotted in Tacoma
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - More than two months after police say Raphael Smith killed a man with a shotgun at a motel on South Hosmer Street, police say he was spotted this week in Tacoma. Detectives are asking the public to be on the lookout for him and to help get him into custody. Kevin Young was robbed and killed on Aug. 21. "It's very hard coming here. I just want to open this door and see him," said his cousin Jonathan Young who visited the motel for the first time last week. "Right now I got goose bumps and I'm shaking. It feels like his spirit's here wanting me to do this to try and catch the guy that did this." Kevin Young was 41 years old when detectives say Smith and another man entered the room with a shotgun and demanded cash, then shot him. "I wish I could open that door and see him and think this is a big dream, but it's not, it's reality," said Young. Kevin Young left behind a son and family who loved him. He'd worked as a fisherman in Alaska, but was struggling in his personal life. "Apparently he didn't have a place to live at the time. He was living in and out of motels or on somebody's couch, and that's all we know." Jonathon Young just wants justice for his cousin. "I just wish I could reach out and grab the guy and pull him and hold him until the cops get him." Tacoma police say Smith and the other accused killer were sent to the hotel to rob Young by a woman who knew Kevin's girlfriend. Marcus Boykin, 30, and Aron Skaro, 32, have both been arraigned in Pierce County Court for the shooting death and a woman has been arrested. Smith is the only suspect still wanted. If you know where Tacoma police can find him, call an anonymous tip into: Crime Stoppers of Tacoma-Pierce County at 1-800-222-TIPS. Read more...
Monday, October 27, 2014 -- 1:43 pm
'It's Alright Ma (It's Only Bob Dylan)'
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - Bob Dylan took his never-ending tour to The Paramount in Seattle for a three-night stand Oct. 17, 18 and 19. Now I had never expected to see Bob Dylan, don't ask me why, but it had always seemed like something on my bucket list that I would never get the chance to cross off. Nevertheless, thanks to a surprise early birthday from my parents (shout out to momma and poppa Contris) I got the chance to cross that little mark off my list of things to do in my life before I die. On Saturday, Oct.18 I went and saw the famed protest singer, Rock N Roll's Shakespeare, Folk's Judas, the born again Christian, the man who introduced weed to The Beatles, the broken hearted traveler, the man who played fucking loud, and you know something? It was pretty damn incredible. Dylan and his backing band played two sets of songs that he has been performing for the majority of the year. As many critics have pointed out, the bulk of Dylan's modern work seems to embrace an era of rock that existed long before he came around to revolutionize it. Rockabilly, bluegrass, Charley Paton inspired (and dedicated to) blues, all rear their heads in the mixed bag that has been Dylan's career throughout the '00's. The show ran for about two hours with a short intermission in between sets, and largely covered material from Dylan's streak of modern comes back albums. After opening with the Oscar award winning "Things Have Changed," The majority of the set emerged from his latest effort, 2012's "Tempest." Outside of "Tempest" the group turned out tunes from 2010's "Together Through Life" and 2008's "Modern Times." As well as including quick nods to the past in the forms of the legendary "Tangled Up In Blue" and "Simple Twist of Fate" both from 1975's "Blood On The Tracks." Highlights from the set include the reworked "Bringing It All back Home" cut, "She Belongs to Me" and the dreamy "Soon After Midnight." The mood in the theater was remarkably laid back, and despite the fact that the songs performed are some of the gloomiest and darkest in Dylan's cannon, it was apparent that he was enjoying himself. The old poet's band was dead on, and it's clear that each member was handpicked with true care as every single one of them seemed extraordinarily tuned to Dylan's presence and style of performance. I would say that the most impressive aspect of these performers was their ability to place as much depth and complexity into their musicianship as they could, while still managing to keep Dylan in the forefront. Never did the band do anything but lay the foundation for him to sing over, never did they eclipse his presence and this produced a near harmonious sensation between band and frontman. Truly impressive.  Much has been said of Dylan's voice in recent years, and I can honestly say that it isn't as bad as you may have heard. His signature whine is still very much intact however it has been buried under the layers of soot gravel and cigarettes that he has been shoving down his throat ove Read more...
Friday, October 24, 2014 -- 9:24 pm
Lincoln clips Wilson in a nail-biter for the 3A Narrows league crown.
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - Full story available at http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ Read more...
Thursday, October 23, 2014 -- 11:56 am
Milton 5k walk/run encourages real life superheroes
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - Over 150 turned out on Oct. 4 to attend "Little Steps, Big Dreams" - local nonprofit Step By Step's 4th annual 5k Walk/Run, raising nearly $30,000 to help babies be born healthy and to build strong families in the community. The 5k Walk/Run was held in Milton near Puyallup on the Milton Interurban Trail. Event sponsors included CHI Franciscan Health, HomeStreet Bank, and Korum Automotive, among others. This year's event featured an activity for young children affectionately named "The Great Caper," where kids received a free superhero cape (donated in part by SuperflyKids) and were given simple, fun activities to practice being a real superhero by embracing positive character traits such as kindness, helpfulness, and perseverance. "We want to help kids realize that being a superhero is not just about having a superpower or being recognized on a stage. At the heart of every real superhero is a strong character, someone who doesn't give up and who cares about the well being of others," said Krista Linden, Step By Step founder and executive director. While there were prizes for race winners, the event was family focused and largely noncompetitive. The nature of the event is to encourage individuals and families to unplug, to get outside and spend a little quality time with their friends and neighbors, for parents to spend time with their children, and for kids to have fun in an atmosphere that encourages teamwork and positive relationships. "We love that the trail is filled with moms pushing their babies in strollers, kids laughing and playing, and teams walking and talking together. It's a chance to simply enjoy time together in the beautiful outdoors - and for a good cause," Linden said. The idea for this year's event came from the organization's overall mission to help babies be born healthy and their belief that every child has the potential to go on to do great things and should be given a healthy start in life - because even superheroes start out small. Proceeds from the event will go to support Step By Step's maternity support program that helps pregnant women in the community who are facing barriers to health, for mom and/or baby. Step By Step provides relational-based programs and resources to help women, so they will deliver a healthy baby, embrace positive parenting, and establish a safe home for themselves and their children. "Together, we are helping to build stronger and healthier families, neighborhoods, and communities - one mom, one baby, one step at a time." For more information about Step by Step, visit stepbystepnews.org. Read more...
Wednesday, October 22, 2014 -- 2:28 pm
Coming Events
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - TW PICK: Halloween Trunk or Treat Sat. Oct. 25, 2 p.m. LeMay-America's Car Museum, 2702 E. D St. Rain or shine. Enjoy a unique way to trick-or-treat! LeMay Halloween Trunk-or-Treat provides a safe environment for families to enjoy an inexpensive afternoon of Halloween fun in a neat atmosphere! Costumed children (age 12 & under) trick-or-treat outdoors by going from car trunk to car trunk to get their bag filled with goodies. Families, individuals or groups host and decorate a collector car, motorcycle, or hearse (regular driver cars are welcome, too) and provide packaged candy to be given out to the children at the event. There is no charge to participate - the more the merrier! Info: www.lemaymarymount.org/lemay-halloween-trunk-or-treat/ Beautiful Tables Showcase Fri. Oct. 24, 10 a.m. Lakewold Gardens, 12317 Gravelly Lake Dr. SW The Beautiful Tables Showcase is the perfect opportunity to see the colorful fall foliage of the gardens and kick off the holiday season. This is a fabulous time to visit The Wagner House when it is decked out in over 30 themed "beautiful" table settings. This event inspires visitors with creative ideas to continue the tradition of entertaining at home. Price: $10, $15. Info: www.lakewoldgardens.org Wind Ensemble Fri. Oct. 24, 6-7:30 p.m. University of Puget Sound, Schneebeck Concert Hall The Wind Ensemble, directed by Gerard Morris, will perform "Wild Flowers for Winds" featuring works by Bach, Grainger, Hahn, and Wagner. Price: Free, tickets not required. Info: (253) 879-3555 or 'The Haunted Theater: Backstage Tour & Eerie Dances' Sat. Oct. 25, 3 p.m. Merlino Art Center, 508 6th Ave. In celebration of Halloween, Tacoma City Ballet transforms the Tacoma City Ballet School, located in The Merlino Art Center, into The Haunted Theatre: Backstage Tour & Eerie Dances. This family-oriented production has become a cherished Halloween tradition in Tacoma. Price: $5. Info: www.tacomacityballet.com Halloween Skate Party Oct 25, 6-8 p.m. Rollin 253, 2101 Mildred St. W., Fircrest Join the girls from Tacoma All Stars Sports Academy and their families for a fun night of spooky skating. Fun for the entire family. Costumes encouraged but not required - there will be a costume contest. Raffle drawing also for a fun night out. Open to the public. $10 Admission includes skate rental fee. Info: www.facebook.com/TacomaAllStarsSportsAcademy tacomaallstaracademy@gmail.co Celebrate Croatian Heritage Sun., Oct. 26, 2-4 p.m. Slavonian Hall, 2306 N. 30th St. All are invited to attend a free reception to celebrate Croatian heritage in Tacoma. This celebration will include an oral history video presentation of six Croatian elders and members of the lodge, which will portray the significant role of The Slavonian American Benevolent Society in the community and the culture of Tacoma and the Croatian people. The Vela Luka Croatian Dance Ensemble will perform traditional Croatian dances and provide education on Read more...
Wednesday, October 22, 2014 -- 2:17 pm
Nightlife
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - TW PICK OF THE WEEK: Fighting Seasonal Affective Disorder? Trying soaking up the sunny, island reggae vibe Hawaii's Rebel Souljahz plan to bring to Jazzbones on Saturday, Oct. 25. The show will kick off at 8 p.m., and tickets are $20; www.jazzbones.com. Friday, Oct. 24 TACOMA COMEDY: Marc Ryan (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $15 B SHARP COFFEE: Live at the Auricle with Lucas Smiraldo (spoken word) 7 p.m., NC, AA GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Nite Crew (dance) 9 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: Coco Montoya (blues) 8 p.m., $20 KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC LOUIE G'S: The Bomb Shelter CD release (rock) 8 p.m., AA MAXWELL'S: Lance Buller Trio (jazz) 7 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Rockbot (live band karaoke) 9 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Ethan Tucker Band (singer-songwriter) 9 p.m., $5-$10 UNCLE SAM'S: Subvinyl Jukebox (rock covers) 8 p.m., $3-$5 UNCLE THURM'S: Jay Mabin & The Blues Perpetrators (blues) 7:30 p.m., NC, AA Saturday, Oct. 25 BOB'S JAVA JIVE: Battersea, Phobos & Deimos (indie-rock) 9 p.m. B SHARP COFFEE: Dean Reichert (blues) 8 p.m., NC, AA DOYLE'S: Groove Planet (funk) 9:30 p.m., NC GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Nite Crew (dance) 9 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: Rebel Souljahz (Hawaiian reggae) 8 p.m., $20 KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC LOUIE G'S: Mechanism, Mom's Rocket, Invasive, $intax (hard rock) 8 p.m., AA NORTHERN PACIFIC: Mister Master, Homeless Man (rock) 7 p.m., AA PANTAGES: Tacoma Symphony Orchestra season opening spectacular (classical) 7:30 p.m., $19-$79 THE SPAR: The Rallies (alt-rock) 8 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Sway (rock) 9 p.m., $5-$10 TACOMA COMEDY: Marc Ryan (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $15 URBAN GRACE: "A Night at the Movies Costume Concert" with Tacoma Youth Symphony and Tacoma Young Artists Orchestra (classical) 7 p.m., $13-$46, AA Sunday, Oct. 26 PANTAGES: The Capitol Steps (political satire) 3 p.m., $19-$69 B SHARP COFFEE: Tacoma Belly Dance Revue, 7 p.m., NC, AA DAWSON'S: Tim Hall Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: 40 Grit (bluegrass jam) 3 p.m., NC THE SPAR: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Marc Ryan (comedy) 8 p.m., $10-$20, 18+ Monday, Oct. 27 NEW FRONTIER: Open mic comedy with Eric "Puddin'" Lorentzen, 9 p.m., NC B SHARP COFFEE: Creative Colloquy (spoken word) 7 p.m., NC, AA GIG SPOT: Monday Mash-Up open mic and trivia, 8 p.m., NC, AA JAZZBONES: Rockaroke (live band karaoke) 11 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Shelly Ely Band (blues) 9 p.m., NC Tuesday, Oct. 28 JAZZBONES: Ha Ha Tuesday with host Ralph Porter (comedy) 8:30 p.m., $5 ANTIQUE SANDWICH CO.: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., $3, AA DAVE'S OF MILTON: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: Open mic, 7 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Leanne Trevalyan (acoustic open mic) 8 p.m., NC Wednesday, Oct. 29 NORTHERN PACIFIC: Zennith Laenid (indie-rock) 7 p.m., NC, AA DAWSON'S: Linda Myers Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: I Wayne, Black Am I, High Ceiling (reggae) 8 p.m., $10 STONEGATE: Dave Nichols' Hump Day Jam, 8:30 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Read more...
Wednesday, October 22, 2014 -- 1:42 pm
Musical Political satire group to perform at Pantages
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - The Capitol Steps - the political satire troupe that will headline the Pantages Theater this weekend - has earned a reputation and a place in the comedic world. The troupe began with a group of Senate staffers who set out to satirize the very people that signed their paychecks. They monitor events and personalities on Capitol Hill, in the Oval Office and other centers of power, and take a humorous look at current issues straight from the headlines. They poke fun at both sides of the aisle with up-to-the-minute song parodies, and take jabs at everything from elections to last year's budget sequester, Obama Care, the Supreme Court, gay marriage and every subject in between. The group was born in December 1981, when Republican congressional staffers Elaina Newport, Bill Strauss and Jim Aidala - then working for Sen. Charles Percy - were planning entertainment for a Christmas party. Their first idea was to stage a nativity play, but in the whole Congress they couldn't find three wise men or a virgin. So, they decided to dig into the headlines of the day, and they created song parodies and skits which conveyed a special brand of satirical humor. In the years that followed, many of the Steps ignored the conventional wisdom "Don't quit your day job!". Based in Washington, DC, the troupe has won numerous awards. Although not all of the current members of the Steps are former Capitol Hill staffers, taken together the performers have worked in a total of eighteen Congressional offices and represent 62 years of collective House and Senate staff experience. Some worked for Democrats, some worked for Republicans, and others worked for politicians who firmly straddle the fence. No matter who holds office, there's never a shortage of material. Says Elaina Newport, "Typically, the Republicans goof up, and the Democrats party. Then the Democrats goof up, and the Republicans party. That's what we call the two-party system."  The Capitol Steps will be bringing their hilarious show to Tacoma's historic Pantages Theater on Oct. 26, and they plan to bring down the House - and Senate - with their unique blend of popular music and sharp political satire. The D.C.-based troupe will be poking fun at all sides of the issues, from left to right, with fresh, up-to-the-minute material inspired by the latest headlines, scandals and more. Since they began, the Capitol Steps have recorded over 30 albums, and the current performance will include songs from their latest album, "How to Succeed in Congress Without Really Lying." Sunday's show will kick off at 3 p.m., with tickets available for $19 to $69; www.broadwaycenter.org. Read more...
Wednesday, October 22, 2014 -- 1:36 pm
Barnes storms Pierce College with dynamic paintings
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - Nathan Barnes is a remarkably talented local artist (he now resides in Olympia) relatively new to the party (he just earned his master of fine art degree from Idaho State University in 2012). Look for him to make an impact in the future. The Pierce College Fort Steilacoom Fine Arts Gallery (on the second floor of the Olympic Building) is currently hosting a show of Barnes' work entitled "Open Ended." The show consists of four of Barnes' monumental sized oil paintings. Barnes combines the multiple perspective of cubism with a streamlined representationalism. Figures, objects and landscape are randomly juxtaposed in surreal scenarios that are shot through with lines of energy and inhabited by floating geometric shapes. Often, one object or body is superimposed over another. Use of multiple perspectives is most apparent in "A Partial Conjunction." The upper part of the canvas offers an aerial view of a rocky beach but these stones become weightless as the eye moves toward the middle of the picture space. In the lower portions, the viewer is looking down upon a blonde boy while simultaneously looking up at the underside of a streetlight. Amid the rocks there is a flailing figure whose head is eclipsed by an enlarged portrait of an excited man wearing a green helmet and rose-tinged goggles. A corkscrew of green energy springs out of the rocks. The upside down, thick, pink icing of a cupcake floats with the stones. The whole topsy-turvy scenario is done with crisp clarity. "CNS" is more abstract. Here, an automotive distributor cap floats above an unraveling roll of wrapping paper. The flat, speckled sparkplug wires wrap around the conduits of an electric meter that is set at the foot of a brick wall. The viewer is placed within a long, cosmic tunnel formed by the ribcage of some prehistoric animal. Above is a series of knobs or tools that art not completely painted in. The whole affair is strange and spacey. "Buoyant World" is a long frieze: nine canvas panels joined together in a long, horizontal composition. There are folds of cloth, wrinkled hands, faces superimposed on each other (to disquieting effect), and line drawings of sumo wrestlers. The whole thing is quite a trippy strip. The show's masterwork is "Emergent World," which has been previously exhibited at a show at the Gallery at Tacoma Community College. In this large painting, a factory complex with smoking chimneys is in the background. In the foreground are old tires and 50-gallon drums. The drain screen from a kitchen sink levitates out toward the viewer. Midrange is a bearded homeless man in his grubby clothes pointing towards a girl in a blue dress seated on a stool in a state of ecstasy. Behind her is a mobile home that is partially exploded to expose interior. At the feet of the man sits a dog dressed in a baggy blue jacket. Squiggly tendrils and lines of energy shoot through the enigmatic scene. The works are disturbing and perplexing. Yet the viewer can't help but be impress Read more...
Wednesday, October 22, 2014 -- 1:31 pm
Culture Corner, A Guide to the Museums of Tacoma
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - Museum of the Week: Slater Museum of Natural History University of Puget Sound, 1500 N. Warner St., #1088? Hours: Sept. through May, Wed. and Thurs. 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. (otherwise by appointment) (253) 879-3356, slatermuseum@pugetsound.edu www.pugetsound.edu/academics/academic-resources/slater-museum/ The museum's primary goal is to provide a well-curated collection of specimens to be used for research and education by the communities to which it belongs: the University of Puget Sound, the Puget Sound region, and, in a broad sense, the world. Museums have an ever-increasing responsibility for the conservation of specimens as animal and plant populations are threatened by human activities, and the Slater Museum is one of the region's significant repositories for these specimens. Furthermore, museum collections serve as the primary sources of information about both spatial and temporal aspects of biodiversity anywhere in the world. To accomplish this, the museum will continue to enhance its collections, especially of regional animals and plants, and to search for orphaned collections to preserve. This week's events: Oct. 29, 6-7:30 p.m. Skulls & Skeletons Night at the Museum! Just in time for Halloween, come get up-close and personal with the skeletal side of things! This event will feature the skulls & skeletons of the Slater collection. You can expect to see the tongue bones of a woodpecker, the amazing arms of a bat, the specialized skeleton of flying birds, and the hard outer shell of an armadillo! Come learn about the many forms and functions of the skeleton. Kid's Activity: Come uncover a skeleton in a "paleontology box." Kids can dig for bones and assemble skeletons with the help of Slater volunteers. Live Animals: You can expect a special guest from the Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium, and learn about their skeletal adaptations. Demonstrations: You can watch Slater volunteers articulating skeletons (which means piecing them together bone by bone into a complete skeleton!). Specimen preparation: As always, our Collections Manager will be turning dead animals into museum specimens. You can ask questions and get hands-on with his dissections and preparations. Visiting Experts: Graduate students from the University of Puget Sound School of Occupational Therapy will present information on how carrying backpacks and purses affects our spines. Also participating: Phi Sigma Biological Honors Society This event is free and family-friendly. Join us at the University of Puget Sound Campus (located at 1500 N. Warner St.) in Thompson Hall room 295. Current Exhibits: Slater Museum of Natural History is a working, interactive laboratory for the study and curation of mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, insects, and plants of the Puget Sound region. Housing more than 75,000 specimens, mostly from Washington, Oregon, and western North America, the museum has become a valued resource for researchers at the university and in Read more...
Wednesday, October 22, 2014 -- 1:18 pm
The Ioannides era of Tacoma Symphony begins this weekend with "Immortal Love"
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - There will be a fresh face behind the podium as Tacoma Symphony Orchestra kicks off its new season the evening of Saturday, Oct. 25, at the Pantages Theater. Sarah Ioannides will make her public debut as incoming music director, conducting TSO as it performs the world premier of Sean O'Boyle's new concerto, "Portraits of Immortal Love." "When somebody dies, you continue loving them forever - that never goes away," Ioannides said recently, speaking with a lilting accent that betrays her British and Australian. "It's got a color, variety and a musical language that is extremely approachable and easy to comprehend," she continued. "It's the sort of piece that draws you in. It's direct and it's clear and it's beautiful in many ways; and it's fun, as well. It's got humor. It's got a lot of character, and he's a great composer. So I think this is going to be an exciting moment for us all." Joining TSO for this weekend's sold-out performance is Grammy-winning, Scottish percussionist Evelyn Glennie. "She is just amazing," Ioannides said. "She's very precise, very dramatic and such a musical talent. She can make one single instrument (produce) a gradual crescendo and, in the middle, get faster and faster and then slow down. The way that she brings her intensity and understanding of simple concepts such as that, it just sort of brings your understanding (of music) to a new level." Ioannides replaces departed music director Harvey Felder, who left Tacoma Symphony last spring after two decades at its helm. Ioannides was born in Australia but grew up in England where she studied French horn, piano and violin. She played with the National Youth Orchestra of Britain as a teenager; but her greatest influence growing up would have been her renowned conductor dad, Ayis Ioannides. "For one, he asked me if I'm really sure about this profession, if I really wanted to do it," she recalled. "(He) actually tried to persuade me not to and to become a violinist. But, when I was obviously sure about it, he was very supportive." Ioannides was assistant conductor of the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra from 2002 to 2004 and the music director for El Paso Symphony Orchestra from 2005 to 2011. She has also served as music director for the Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchestra, in South Carolina, for the past 10 years. She first led Tacoma Symphony during an audition concert in February 2013. The New York Times has hailed her as "a conductor of unquestionable strength and authority," and The Los Angeles Times referred to her as "one of six female conductors breaking the glass podium," a reference to the sexism that still seems to persist in her field. "We are still evolving in our mindset of equality, and it is still gradually becoming accepted as a career that women can pursue," Ioannides said. "I try not to dwell on that kind of thing. I just try to do what I do in the most vibrant and inspiring way, and the best I can as a musician and a conductor. I'm thrilled t Read more...




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