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Monday, October 20, 2014 -- 2:41 pm
PLU STUDENT SELECTED FOR PRESTIGIOUS NATIONAL COUNCIL
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Monday, October 20, 2014 -- 12:40 pm
Tacoma's container volumes surge in September
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Friday, October 17, 2014 -- 9:57 pm
Unbeaten Lincoln handles Central Kitsap 41-14 - One win away from 3A Narrows crown
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Friday, October 17, 2014 -- 10:36 am
Week-long SR 7 ramp closure to I-5 in Tacoma begins Monday
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Thursday, October 16, 2014 -- 12:53 pm
Community honors Japanese heritage with school monument
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - The Japanese Language School that sat on the slope of what is now the University of Washington Tacoma campus was a place of safety, serenity, community and learning during the first half of the last century. A monument unveiled last week near the site is now set to continue that tradition for generations to come. A community effort raised money and awareness about the role the school played in Tacoma's history and created the memorial park and public art installation of "Maru," by Seattle-based bronze artist Gerard Tsutakawa at the corner of South 17th Street and Pacific Avenue. The location is part of the new Prairie Line trail, which opened earlier this fall. Tsutakawa is best known for his iconic "Mitt" sculpture at Safeco Field. The Japanese Language School, known as Nihongo Gakko, served as a community center and place of learning for Tacoma's Japanese community from 1911 until it was closed in 1942, with the internment of people of Japanese descent during the Second World War. The school never reopened because many of its former students opted not to return to Tacoma. The former school on the 1700 block of Tacoma Avenue remained vacant for decades and was finally torn down 10 years ago out of concerns for public safety during the rise of the UWT campus around it and after an effort to save the building failed to prove feasible. University officials and community leaders then shifted to memorializing the school, an effort that was stalled by the economic downturn of last year but still managed to raise $160,000 for the project. The nine-foot sculpture near the site was designed to draw visitors and invites interaction and contemplation in the pocket garden designed by Kenichi Nakano with plaques inlaid into Cascade granite boulders telling the story of the school and its role in the community. Funding for the project came largely from private donations and support from the Greater Tacoma Community Foundation. "Maru," or "Circle," is now situated among a landscape of boulders and Japanese maple trees. The sculpture's signature cut-out circle is wide enough for people to sit in, and is designed to be interactive as well as serve as a symbol of Japanese heritage. It looks much like the Japanese "red circle" flag, for example. One boulder plaque tells the story of the school's principal, while another lists the donors who made the memorial possible. Students of the school would attend public school and then attend classes on Japanese culture, language, art and philosophy between 4 and 6 p.m. every day and occasionally on Saturdays so they could stay connected to their Japanese heritage, which was at the heart of a thriving Japanese community in the southend of downtown Tacoma up until World War II. The school was operated by Sensei Masato Yamasaki and his wife Kinu, who inspired the students to behave with dignity in an environment fraught with discrimination. They taught lessons on Japanese heritage and culture while deeply promoting ci Read more...
Thursday, October 16, 2014 -- 11:39 am
Out of my Element Special: Body Building
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - In keeping with the tradition of the previous "Out of My Element" articles, I tried to do only minimal research before attending the 2014 NPC NWCC Northern Classic Championships for bodybuilding, fitness, figure, physique, and bikini at the Broadway Center for the Performing Arts on October 11th. Since I am not what you would typically consider a gym enthusiast, however, I felt I needed at least a small amount of context to fully appreciate the event. The website was brief and geared more towards the contestants though, so I went in with little idea of what to expect outside of routines choreographed to music performed by muscular, spray tanned bodies. I would not be disappointed. When we passed a line in the lobby in front of the table giving away sample protein bars, followed by the empty space in front of the chocolate and candy for sale, I knew I was definitely very out of my element. The "Look Better Naked" sign in the center of the stage did little to make me feel at home; I am still living off my laurels of a month-long misguided attempt at joining a CrossFit gym nine months ago. But whatever trepidations I had were gone the instant the event started. The emcee, Tacoma native Kim "Kong" Farrison, entered after great pomp and circumstance, and lived up to his title as the "King of all Emcees" with his lively banter and eye-catching red suit. The event was sold-out for the first time, and the crowd was having a great time being supportive and cheering for the contestants, many of whom were participating in the competition for the first time. Winners of their divisions were presented with trophies or, even better, swords. Debbie Salzman performed the first routine of the night, and she had me totally hooked from the start. I had not known what to expect, but it was definitely not hand stands and push-ups thrown in with tap dancing to Broadway hits such as "All That Jazz" and "Diamonds are a Girl's Best Friend." It was nothing short of awesome. She went on to be the overall Women's Fitness Champion. When the men started their routines, I thought there was no way they could be as entertaining as the women, but boy was I wrong. In the Men's Master Figure Over-60, Rick Frahm came out wearing black and white boas, white shade, a black do-rag, and flexed to "Voodoo Chile". His Hulk Hogan routine was made complete when he ripped his tank off, much to the audience's delight. David Patterson, another Tacoma native, performed Michael Jackson's "Billie Jean" routine while wearing the trademark shoes, hat, sequined silver glove, and of course a white Speedo suit. David went on to win his division. The women in the Open Figure D (over 5'6") Women's Bikini division were some of my favorites. Being 6'0" myself, I'm always on the lookout for fellow tall girls. These women looked like Amazonian warriors. University Place's Valerie Sutherland was the winner of the sword for this division, which she added to her collection from winning the Master's Figure Read more...
Thursday, October 16, 2014 -- 9:46 am
Coming Events
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - Zoo Boo Sun., Oct. 19 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium, 5400 N. Pearl St. Put on your best costume for a fun, fall-themed weekend at the zoo. Come watch the animals enjoy special pumpkin enrichments, and see how creative the keepers are at designing their jack-o-lanterns. Price: $12.50-$15 adults; $10.50-$13 youth; $6.25-$8.75 tots; free kids 2 and under. Info: (253) 591-5337 Asylum Hospital From Hell Fri., Oct. 17 6-11:30 p.m. Freighthouse Square, East 25th St. and East D St. Deep in the dark recesses of "Frighthouse Scare" exists the remains of a most horrific chapter of Tacoma history. This is Tacoma's premier and longest-running haunt with 39 years of horrific history that keeps everyone guessing if they will be next to be admitted permanently. The first hour of every open day, 6-7 p.m., is family time low scare/no scare. After 7 p.m. it's full scare. Price: $15/$40 (VIP) Info: (253) 223-3256 'Shrek the Musical' Fri., Oct. 17 8 p.m. Tacoma Musical Playhouse, 7116 Sixth Ave. "Shrek the Musical" tells the story of a swamp-dwelling orge who goes on a life-changing adventure to reclaim the deed to his land. Joined by a wisecracking donkey, this unlikely hero fights a fearsome dragon, rescues a feisty princess and learns that real friendship and true love aren't only found in fairy tales. Price: $29 adults, $27 senior/military/students, $20 children, $25 groups of 10 or more Info: (253) 565-6867 'Spring This Fall' Sat., Oct. 18 7:30 p.m. Rialto Theater, 310 S. Ninth St. Tacoma Concert Band opens the season featuring the sensational artistry of virtuoso clarinetist Robert Spring who will be playing "Variations on the Carnival of Venice" by Paul Jeanjean; "Concerto for Clarinet" by Artie Shaw; and "The Flight of the Bumble Bee." There will be music to please everyone including two major compositions for symphonic band: David Holsinger's award w-winning, rhythmic and stunning, "Liturgical Dances" and David Maslanka's monumental "Give Us This Day," a moving, colorful, short symphony. Price: Beginning at $18 Info: (253) 591-5894 x1 Light The Night Walk Sat., Oct. 18 4-9 p.m. Ruston Way Waterfront, Ruston Way Light The Night is the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society's (LLS) annual fundraising walk and the nation's night to pay tribute and bring hope to people battling blood cancer. Each fall, teams of friends, families and co-workers raise funds for cancer research. On walk night, participants walking in the twilight hold illuminated lanterns: white for survivors, red for supporters and gold in memory of someone lost. More than a walk, the evening also includes music, food, and family activities. Price: Registration required Info: (206) 628-0777 'Had I Not Seen the Sun' Sun., Oct. 19 4 p.m. Urban Grace Church, 902 Market St. In its inaugural performance, the Red Thread Ensemble partners with Oasis Youth Center and Harmony Hill Retreat Center to explore the power of community to heal. Featuring c Read more...
Wednesday, October 15, 2014 -- 2:53 pm
WMW Fugitive Caught: Spanaway armed home invasion suspect
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - Deputies with the Pierce County Sheriff's Department's Community Support Team and officers in the Department of Corrections Southwest Community Response Unit arrested Washington's Most Wanted fugitive Robert James in Parkland Tuesday, Oct. 14. He is charged with Robbery in the 1st degree for an armed home invasion in Spanaway on March 13, 2014. "The suspect in this case is extremely dangerous," said Det. Ed Troyer of the Pierce County Sheriff's Department. "In this particular case he was armed when they did a residential robbery. He and his partners went in, pointed guns at the home occupants, took their TV, jewelry, anything of value before fleeing." Detectives were able to identity James through a fingerprint found on a bottle of alcohol that was brought to the victim's apartment by the suspects.  "The defendant ran, the defendant hid, but thanks to Washington's Most Wanted and a bottle of vodka, he was caught," said Pierce County Prosecutor Mark Lindquist. "Home invasion robberies are terrible crimes - the defendant will be aggressively prosecuted and off our streets for decades." James was featured on Aug. 8 on WMW as a Crime Stoppers of TacomaPierce County case. Deputies say he had cut his hair very short while hiding from authorities. James is the 564th WMW fugitive caught. Read more...
Wednesday, October 15, 2014 -- 2:40 pm
Nightlife
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - TW PICK OF THE WEEK: Revelers at Maltoberfest 9 will guzzle copious amounts of Brass Monkey on Oct. 18 as they groove to DJ Melodica, The Breakfast Cowboy, 508 Disturbance, Brainstorm and Olympia's Artesian Rumble Arkestra (pictured). The Oktoberfest parody - dedicated to cheap malt liquor - will kick off at 7 p.m. at Stonegate Pizza, and admission set at $15; www.stonegaterocks.com. Friday, Oct. 17 HALF PINT: Indigenous Robot, Static and the Cubes (garage-rock) 9 p.m., NC DOYLE'S: St. Practice Day with Polecat (bluegrass, reggae, world) 9 p.m., NC KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC MAXWELL'S: Lance Buller Trio (jazz) 7 p.m., NC NORTHERN PACIFIC: Voxxy Vallejo, Michele Ari, Clearly Beloved (rock, singer-songwriter) 7 p.m., NC, AA STONEGATE: Rumble Underground (rock) 9 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Sin City (Top 40) 9 p.m., $5-$10 TACOMA COMEDY: Ron Funches (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $15 UNCLE SAM'S: I Fell Down, Saintz of Mayhem, Surgical Kaos (rock) 8 p.m. UNCLE THURM'S: CJK with Gary Crooks, Mike Jaap and Kurt Kolstad (jazz) 7:30 p.m., NC, AA Saturday, Oct. 18 STONEGATE: Rumble Underground (rock) 9 p.m., NC B SHARP COFFEE: Kareem Kandi Trio (jazz) 8 p.m., NC, AA DOYLE'S: A Ceder Suede (world, funk) 9:30 p.m., NC EMERALD QUEEN: Tim Allen (comedy) 8:30 p.m., $40-$100 GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Vietnamese night (Vietnamese pop) 9 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: Folsom Prism (Johnny Cash tribute) 8 p.m., $8 KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC LOUIE G'S: Louie G's Birthday Bash with Amadon, Klover Jane, A Lien Nation, Prophets of Addiction (rock) 6 p.m., NC, AA RIALTO: Tacoma Concert Band presents "Spring this Fall" (classical) 7:30 p.m., $18-$36, AA THE SPAR: Tatoosh (classic rock) 8 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Kry (rock covers) 9 p.m., $5-$10 TACOMA COMEDY: Ron Funches (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $15 UNCLE SAM'S: Generation Unknown (rock) 8 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 19 THE SPAR: Rod Cook and Toast (blues, rock) 7 p.m., NC DAWSON'S: Tim Hall Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: 40 Grit (bluegrass jam) 3 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Battle of the Sexes: Halloween Edition (comedy) 8 p.m., $10, 18+ Monday, Oct. 20 NEW FRONTIER: Open mic comedy with Eric "Puddin'" Lorentzen, 9 p.m., NC B SHARP COFFEE: Stay Sharp Poetry with William James Hassertt (spoken word) 5 p.m., NC, AA GIG SPOT: Monday Mash-Up open mic and trivia, 8 p.m., NC, AA JAZZBONES: Rockaroke (live band karaoke) 11 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Dean Reichert (blues) 9 p.m., NC Tuesday, Oct. 21 JAZZBONES: Ha Ha Tuesday with host Ralph Porter (comedy) 8:30 p.m., $5ANTIQUE SANDWICH CO.: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., $3, AA DAVE'S OF MILTON: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: Open mic, 7 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Leanne Trevalyan (acoustic open mic) 8 p.m., NC Wednesday, Oct. 22 JAZZBONES: Speeding Kills Bears, Pasadena (indie-rock) 8 p.m., $5 DAWSON'S: Linda Myers Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Dave Nichols' Hump Day Jam, 8:30 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Comedy open mic, 8 p.m., NC, 18+ Read more...
Wednesday, October 15, 2014 -- 2:28 pm
China Davis impresses with new "Arctic Days" CD
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - The latest album from China Davis, "Arctic Days," starts off with a somber and relaxing melody layered with alternating acoustic and electric guitars giving ample room for vocalist Ben Fuller to do his thing. It's an epic tune called "Anjilla" that's well arranged, and clearly a lot of work was put into it to get it just right. The song speaks of the waves, shoreline and maybe a little bit of the sailor's life. This song charts the path for the rest of album and it was my personal favorite, with the title track coming in a close second.  Song number three, "Beautiful Girl" is reminiscent of early U2, with Fuller's voice taking center stage with the instrumentation complimenting the heart-felt lyrics written about Fuller's daughter. All through the CD, the instruments seem to never get in the way or over power his voice, as he tells story after story in these songs. This collection of tunes has a theme that comes up time and again, and that is the water. Whether it is the open sea, a lake or a river, Fuller has poetically woven that common thread into the fabric of the songs. He sings these with an almost urgency to get these words out of himself and out into the universe.   China Davis was formed by brothers Ben and Ted Fuller in Gig Harbor, and their music has that sort of small town fishing village honesty about it. "Arctic Days" is not an album full of frills or tricks but rather it's a truthful artistic expression of a few musicians that do this because they probably need to. The album shows some slight similarities to their 2007 release, "Shadowdancing," which had a song called "The Lark" that I still love to this day. This album is, however, a bit more subdued, and songs like the fifth track "In The Way," powered by a lovely piano melody and great backing vocals, sounds like something Springsteen could have come up with in his earlier days.  Parts of the album were recorded at Urban Grace Church in Tacoma and The Arctic Garage in Seattle with the aforementioned Ben Fuller on vocals, guitar and the piano while his brother, Ted, contributes the tasty lead guitar throughout. Eric Balcom did the bulk of the bass tracks, and Andrew Stockton turned in a fine job on the drums. China Davis is a unique band with a distinct yet familiar sound that follows no tired and worn out formula. The album doesn't feel as if they were out to reinvent the wheel; they just made the music that comes natural to them. The final tune on Arctic Days is a guitar ballad that once again showcases Ben Fuller's steady voice, a theme that is consistent throughout the album, as he seems to call to and conjure up an angel from out at sea. The collection of songs is an introspective musical journey for the band that leaves nothing to be desired and the record is definitely worth a listen.  "Arctic Days" can be found online at bandcamp.com. Read more...
Wednesday, October 15, 2014 -- 2:23 pm
Centerstage explores the good, the bad of sex with "My First Time"
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - Whether "the event" is planned or spontaneous, pleasant or horrible, the moment people lose their virginity contains a memorable story. Here are some of those stories. Centerstage's season opener is a well-crafted collection of "losing one's virginity" stories collected from a website, MyFirstTime.com, that has operated since 1998 and contains thousands of stories from around the world. Some stories presented in this off-Broadway hit are sweet and loving, others are violent and horrific. Others are hilariously filled with awkward bouts with surging hormones, while others are flooded with reason and senses of purpose. They are all, ultimately, stories about the myriad worlds of humanity found on this dustball floating in space. Ken Davenport, author of "Altar Boyz" culled through the more than 100,000 "first time" stories to craft a single play that spans the spectrum of sexuality so that every audience member could both relate to the show and be challenged by it. At the root of the show's genius is its seeming simplicity. Actors are given stories written by others and asked to perform them. There are no character profiles or background or plots or unifying settings actors could draw from to craft their performances. They simply had to bring the words to life however they saw fit. One attempt might mean a Southern accent, while another draws straight from the mouths of a Jersey girl. Anna Kasabyan, making her directorial debut, clearly let the actors "explore through failure" in finding just the right character for otherwise lifeless words in a script. Hannah Ruwe, Joe Cummings, Joshua Williamson and Leah Pfenning obviously had fun along the theatrical journey. Their chemistry, both with their own monologue and each other, was brilliantly evident. Their parade of monologues stitched together with quickly timed word play and casually natural asides created a whole rather than a collection of parts that didn't require extensive scene shifts or wardrobe changes. The play rolls on through the minds of the audience members, who often seem more like friends gathered around a table to share "first time" stories over a bottle of wine than theatergoers watching a performance. Because of its content matter, "My First Time," is recommended for mature audiences only. The play runs at 8 p.m. on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays and at 2 p.m. on Sundays through Oct. 26 at Centerstage, 3200 SW Dash Point Rd. in Federal Way. Tickets are available at www.centerstagetheatre.com or by calling (253) 661-1444. Read more...
Wednesday, October 15, 2014 -- 2:08 pm
Tacoma's Metal-Urge Galvanizes Regional Arts Community
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - Metal-Urge, a citywide celebration of metal arts, explores the many ways that artists push this versatile and diverse medium. From Oct. 1-Nov. 30, 31 Tacoma venues will feature metal-themed exhibits, workshops, lectures, festivals and more. "Metal-Urge really embraces the many ways that metal is used as an art form, from sculpture and jewelry to cars and brass musical instruments," said Tacoma Arts Administrator Amy McBride. "More than 80 regional metal artists are exhibiting throughout the city, Tacoma Art Museum is bringing a major metals exhibit to town, and we welcome the 19th Annual Seattle Metals Guild Symposium to Tacoma for the first time." Some Metal-Urge highlights include: Metal-Urge Free Community Festival Come out for a free, fun-filled afternoon of metal arts on Oct. 19 from noon-3 p.m. at Tollefson Plaza (South 17th Street and Pacific Avenue). Below the majesty of Mary Coss' site-specific public art installation "Three Graces," watch live sword fighting reenactments by Knights of Veritas, see a molten iron pour and create a scratch block with Tacoma Community College's sculpture department, and check out a blacksmithing demonstration with Lisa Geertson and Scott Szloch. Try your hand at making a textured metal charm with Tacoma Metal Arts Center and participate in some hands-on crafts with Tacoma Art Museum. Do all this while listening to steel drum music under the direction of Miho Takekawa and munching on refreshments from food trucks. Protective Ornament: Contemporary Amulets to Armor This exhibit at Tacoma Art Museum (1701 Pacific Ave.), running Oct. 18-Feb. 1, 2015, showcases nearly 100 pieces including helmets, brass knuckles, breastplates, aggressive or defensive jewelry, chain mail, amulets, talismans, and protective gear designed to address issues of protection and empowerment in the face of everyday perils and social challenges. Ranging from protective hardware (physical fortification) and protective "software" (faith-based adornment), the array of contemporary works underlines the crucial safeguarding function of jewelry and other wearable ornaments. Organized by the National Ornamental Metal Museum Foundation, Inc., the exhibition was curated by Metalsmith magazine editor Suzanne Ramljak. Seattle Metals Guild 19th Annual Northwest Jewelry & Metals Symposium This metal arts symposium, held on Oct. 19 at the Washington State History Museum (1911 Pacific Ave.) features lectures by Metalsmith magazine editor Suzanne Ramljak, historian Stephen Fliegel, Vivian Beer, artist Jennifer Trask, jeweler Todd Pownell, and metalsmith Myra Mimlitsch-Gray. For more information, or to register, visit seattlemetalsguild.org/programs/symposium. For more information visit TacomaMetalUrge.com. Metal-Urge is organized by the Tacoma Arts Commission and sponsored by Click! Cable TV and The Greater Tacoma Community Foundation. Read more...
Wednesday, October 15, 2014 -- 1:53 pm
Culture Corner
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - Washington State Historical Museum 1911 Pacific Ave., Tacoma, WA 98402 Wed.-Sun., 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Info: www.washingtonhistory.org The Washington State History Museum is where fascination and fun come together. People of all ages can explore and be entertained in an environment where characters from Washington's past speak about their lives. Through interactive exhibits, theatrical storytelling, high-tech displays and dramatic artifacts, learn about our state's unique people and places, as well as their impact on the country and the world. This weeks events: American Pandemic: The Lost Worlds of the 1918 Pandemic Oct. 18, 1 p.m. University of Puget Sound historian and professor Dr. Nancy Bristow presents an illustrated program on the global influenza pandemic that began at the end of World War I. How did the flu affect Americans reeling from their involvement in the Great War? What did our country do to combat this deadly infection? What is the connection between the flu and the war? Special presentation at 2 p.m. Joining Bristow will be a public health expert to talk about current planning for pandemic and localized medical emergencies focused on infectious disease. Learn about growing your own food and safe practices of home food preservation from community garden and food safety experts. Self-Sufficiency: WWI and the Food Movement to be Self-Sufficient Oct. 18, 3 p.m. During the Great War, Americans were encouraged to grow and can their own food, partly because a lot of the mass-produced food was sent to Europe to feed the troops and the French citizens. Americans were asked to substitute potatoes for flour, use peanut butter, and become more self-sufficient at feeding themselves. During this presentation, try samples of harvest produce eaten commonly 100 years ago. Curator Talk and Tour: Seeds of Victory with Jim Givan Oct. 18, 11 a.m. Mr. Jim Givan will present a talk on his large poster collection focused on military themes, which forms the heart of "Seeds of Victory: Posters of the Great War." In addition to a post-presentation gallery tour, Givan, a natural storyteller, will share his expertise on how to build a focused collection, how to spot fakes and forgeries, and how to look for quality pieces at good value. Hear about his most remarkable finds. Exhibits: Time Intrusionator Through Jan., 2015 Who will be the next Keeper? Could it be you? Enter the fabulous-miraculous world of Ernest Oglby Punkweiler and journey to unexpected places in time. Enter through the Teapot Curiosity Shop, the tiny-but-extraordinary empire of The Keeper. Based on a children's story of the same name, this exhibit allows you to explore along with young Ernest and "intrusionate" in time. The secret to success? Bring your camera and your imagination! Seeds of Victory: Posters of the Great War This year is the 100th anniversary of the beginning of World War I, which was known as the "War to End All Wars" and "The Great War." Though the peace Read more...
Wednesday, October 15, 2014 -- 1:44 pm
The Things We Like
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - EVELYN GLENNIE Percussion superstar Dame Evelyn Glennie will take center stage with her vast array of instruments Oct. 25 when the Tacoma Symphony Orchestra opens its 2014-2015 performance season at Pantages Theater, 7:30 p.m. The new season opener will also mark the inaugural concert of new Music Director Sarah Ioannides, whose appointment was announced late last year on the heels of a two-year search encompassing a hundred international applicants. For tickets, $19 and up, visit www.tacomasymphony.org or call (253) 591-5894. 'THE BOYS NEXT DOOR' Pacific Lutheran University's School of Arts and Communication and the Department of Communication & Theatre present "The Boys Next Door" by Tom Griffin, directed by Jeff CLapp. The production opens in Eastvold Auditorium of the Karen Hille Phillips Center for the Performing Arts on Oct. 17, 18, 24 and 25 at 7:30 p.m. and Oct. 26 at 2 p.m. This touching, funny play focuses on the lives of four disabled men in a communal residence where little things sometimes become momentous (and often funny), with are moments of great poignancy that remind us that the handicapped, like the rest of us, want only to love and laugh and find purpose in this world. Tickets can be purchased thought the Community Box Office on the first level of the Anderson University Center or call (253) 535-7411. COSTUME CONCERT Tacoma Youth Symphony celebrates the Halloween season with a "Costume Concert" on Saturday, Oct. 25, 7 p.m. at Urban Grace Church, 902 Market St. The young musicians will be dressed as characters from the movies, and the audience is invited to come in costume too. The concert will feature music from "The Fellowship of the Ring," "Star Wars," Disney's "Frozen," "The Lone Ranger," "Close Encounters of the Third Kind" and "A Muppet Medley." Tickets: $13, $19, and $46 for a family four-pack. Call (253) 627-2792 to purchase individual tickets or group packages for the 14-15 season. HALLOWEEN SKATE Join the girls from Tacoma All Stars Sports Academy, their friends and families for a fun night of spooky skating at Rollin 253 Skate and Community Center, 2101 Mildred St. W. in Fircrest, 6-8 p.m. Fun for the entire family. Costumes encouraged but not required - there will be a costume contest. Raffle drawing also for a fun night out! Tacoma All Stars Sports Academy is a basketball team of young girls ages 8-12. Proceeds go toward facility rental for practice and league games fees. $10 Admission includes skate rental fee. ED TAYLOR Ed Taylor is an amazingly talented guitar and vocal artist with exceptional passion for music. He will be having an event on Oct. 18 at Urban Timber Coffee, 6621 166th Ave. E. in Sumner. This show will showcase songs from his latest album, "It's Complicated," and will also have special guests. The show is from 7:30-9:30 p.m. Learn more about Taylor at www.edtaylormusic.com. Read more...
Wednesday, October 15, 2014 -- 1:35 pm
The Mind of Maltin
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - The Tacoma Film Festival went big in its ninth year. Not only did the Grand Cinema's signature event feature higher profile films this month - edgy flicks starring the likes of Kirsten Dunst, Sam Rockwell and the late Philip Seymour Hoffman - but organizers also scored a major coup by landing high-profile speaker Leonard Maltin, among the most popular film critics and historians in America. Maltin - best known for reviewing films for "Entertainment Tonight" and his "Leonard Maltin Movie Guide" - made a couple of appearances at the festival on Oct. 10 and 11; and, in between, he met with Tacoma Weekly in the lobby of Hotel Murano to talk about being a smarter viewer, the toll blogging has taken on his craft and why you should quit paying for 3D. Here's some of what he had to say. Tacoma Weekly: What is the first film you remember seeing? Maltin: The first film I have a memory of seeing is Walt Disney's "Snow White and the Seven Dwarves," when it was reissued in the '50s. And, in those days ... you could stay and watch a movie four times. They wouldn't kick you out. The reason I bring that up is that what I remember is my mother taking me by the hand into the theater as everybody was leaving. So what I saw was ... the last shot as Snow White and the Prince go off into the golden sun for their happy ending. That image is burned permanently into my memory and my psyche. TW: How old were you? Maltin: Either four or five. TW: In contrast, what are the films you most wish you could forget? Maltin: Fortunately, I'm forgetting them. (He laughs.) I'm at an age now where they're starting to drop out of the memory banks. TW: You got started at a young age, and I'm curious what you think you would be doing if the whole critic/film historian thing didn't work out. Maltin: I wanted to be a cartoonist when I was very young - not an animator, but a cartoonist. I even submitted cartoons to several magazines and got rejection slips. But then I wrote to some of my heroes, and I got the most phenomenal, personal letter from Charles M. Schultz in which he was very encouraging and enclosed a signed, original "Peanuts" daily. TW: That's pretty cool. Maltin: Then, about 30 years later, I got hired to interview him. ... I told him that story. He jumped out of his seat and said, "Well, we gotta get something newer." He went and found a Sunday original page and signed it to me and my wife, only this time he signed it "Sparky," which was his nickname. TW: Is that still hanging in your living room? Maltin: You bet, both of them - the old one and the newer one. TW: What advice would you give someone who is 14, 15 - like you were when you were first starting out - if they want to break into the business? Maltin: I'm glad I'm not trying to break in today. I don't know how you make a reputation today, how you make yourself heard or noticed amid the clutter. Everything has changed. (Long pause.) What can you say to someone except, "If this is your passi Read more...
Wednesday, October 15, 2014 -- 1:22 pm
Guest Editorial: How about an early Thanksgiving this year?
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - Since 1957, our Canadian friends and neighbors have celebrated Thanksgiving on the second Monday of October. Perhaps, this year we ought to join them. Given the good news of our state's bountiful apple and cherry harvests this year, we could actually cook two turkeys - one with the Canadians on Oct. 13 and the other on Nov. 27 when our Americans traditionally get together. Here is why. Apples are the state's largest agriculture crop. The Washington apple industry is expecting a record harvest this year, enough to fill 140 million 40-pound boxes. That would be an 8 percent increase over the previous record in 2012. The increased crop yield is due to more high-density plantings coming into production, Bruce Grim, executive director of the Washington State Horticultural Association, told the Washington Times. Washington apple producers have another advantage. Desmond O'Rourke, a retired Washington State University agricultural economist, told the Times the downward price pressure could hit East Coast apple producers more because they have older varieties and consumers prefer the Washington varieties. Washington has 31,600 acres in apple production, which generated $2.25 billion in 2012. Today, our state's growers account for seven out of 10 apples grown in the nation. The state's $49 billion food and agriculture industry employs approximately 160,000 people and contributes 13 percent to the state's economy. That's more than Boeing. About a third of our crops are exported. The Washington State Dept. of Agriculture estimates more than $15.1 billion in food and agricultural products were exported through Washington ports in 2013, the third largest total in the U.S. Wheat is second on the list of the state's cash crop, worth $1.18 billion in 2012, but the news is not as good there. Too much heat and too little rain this summer are taking a toll on the winter wheat crop in Eastern Washington. This year's crop is down an average of about 30 percent from last year's yield and slightly below the 10-year average. But our state has a bumper crop of cherries. Over the last decade, the state's cherry production - Bings, Rainiers and a host of other varieties - has surged as newer higher-yield trees bear fruit and overall acreage has increased. The state now has about 40,000 acres of cherries in production. Washington's crop could be up to 21 million boxes this year, which would make it second only to 2012, the Washington Cherry Commission reported. And prices are running about $70 a box for cherries, about 50 percent higher than normal. The high prices Washington growers hope to get are largely due to the woes of California competitors, who have seen their cherry crop drop from eight million boxes to three million due to drought. In fact, the California drought left an estimated 420,000 acres of farmland unplanted this year, or about 5 percent of the total. California kept much of its agriculture alive by switching from surface water to wells in Read more...
Wednesday, October 15, 2014 -- 1:21 pm
Guest Editorial: It takes everyone to succeed
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - The leaders, business owners and politicians of tomorrow are sitting in classrooms today. Those classrooms are underfunded. They have been for decades. State lawmakers are even under a contempt of court order on that fact because they have failed to accomplish their "paramount duty" of funding public education at levels outlined in the state Constitution. Ponder the ramifications of that chronic underfunding for a moment. Absent state lawmakers completing their sworn duty to follow the state Constitution regarding public education, school districts have had to float levies and bonds to fill the funding gaps caused by legislative inaction. That has caused voters to resent school districts themselves for constantly asking for money to fund basic education, largely not knowing their elected officials were actually to blame. And that blame is not in dispute. The only argument left is how lawmakers will come up with the billions of dollars they are constitutionally obligated to spend on public education since the Supreme Court issued its ruling on the issue in 2012. The order has been answered by still more inaction, prompting the contempt decision. It is in front of this backdrop of less-than-adequate funding that fed into the issues of low student achievement in Tacoma Schools for decades. And it is in this backdrop that students are finding increasing success as school officials, business leaders and community boosters have cobbled together programs and partnerships that promote the concept of "cradle to career" education for all. Graduation rates in Tacoma schools were hovering at a shameful 58 percent five years ago, and are now about 70 percent, well on its way to reaching the goal of 85 percent by 2020. If such successes can be found without adequate funding, imagine what can happen if that money flows into local education the way the state Constitution mandates. But it takes more than money to prepare students for successful and rewarding careers. Possibly more important than dollars, in fact, are the mentors, roll models, goal setters, coaches and community cheerleaders who promote education in everyday life and support the efforts of students to set their sights on challenging goals rather than ones that offer immediate rewards and self gratification. That means you. Everyone in the community has roles to play in educating our children, since these children are in the "classroom of the real world" more than they are sitting behind desks or hunched over beakers in chemistry classes. You are their teachers, albeit subtly, at every encounter. At the coffee shop. At the bus station. At the movies. On the neighborhood sidewalks, and home. If you don't happen to have a student in your life and are interested in playing a larger role in the success of the community's future leaders, the school district has the Community Partnership Office, and can connect you to a volunteer opportunity that fits your schedule and interests. That office can Read more...
Wednesday, October 15, 2014 -- 12:51 pm
Business Spotlight: Gessel Orthodontics
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - Tacoma orthodontist Dr. Thomas Gessel utilizes modern, advanced orthodontic technology including the Empower bracket system, as well as Invisalign. Dr. Gessel is a native of Tacoma, graduating from Curtis High School. Dr. Gessel began his post high school education with a degree in Business Management from Brigham Young University. From there, Dr. Gessel attended the Harvard School of Dental Medicine and completed a post-doctoral residence in orthodontics at the University of Louisville. "I love being an orthodontist. It allows me the opportunity to combine my passion for science, aesthetics, and patient care in a fun and rewarding career. I enjoy getting to know each of my patients personally, customizing treatment plans, and delivering the best possible results," said Dr. Gessel. Dr. Gessel's website, www.gesselbraces.com, offers some tips to determine if you or your child are candidates for orthodontic treatment. Some symptoms of common orthodontic problems include crooked teeth, gaps between the teeth, or overlapping teeth. Bite all the way down, but keep your lips open so you can see the teeth. Do the front teeth line up with the bottom? Do the top teeth protrude out away from the bottom teeth? Do the top front teeth cover more than 50 percent of the bottom teeth? Are the top teeth behind the bottom teeth? All of these are also indicators for orthodontic treatment. Look at your jaw alignment. Does the jaw shift off center when biting down? If you see any misalignment or shifting of the jaw, it suggests a skeletal or jawbone problem, which requires early orthodontic intervention. Gessel Orthodontics offers free consultations to develop a customized plan for you or your child's orthodontic needs. Dr. Gessel is a PPO provider for all insurances and no down payment is required. Appointment times are flexible to accommodate patients' active schedules. October is National Orthodontic Health month and Dr. Gessel is celebrating by offering $350 off of full treatment for all new patients. "We want to encourage members of the community to set up a complimentary consultation to find out how orthodontic treatment can improve their health, improve their smiles and boost their confidence," Dr. Gessel said. Dr. Gessel is currently accepting new patients. For more information on Gessel Orthodontics, please call (253) 503-1023 or visit www.gesselbraces.com to set up a free consultation. Read more...
Wednesday, October 15, 2014 -- 12:44 pm
TACOMA'S HOT TICKETS
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - OCT. 17 - OCT. 26 FRIDAY, OCT. 17 - VOLLEYBALL Whitman vs. Puget Sound UPS Fieldhouse - 7 p.m. FRIDAY, OCT. 17 - HS FOOTBALL Yelm vs. Bellarmine Prep Bellarmine HS - 7 p.m. FRIDAY, OCT. 17 - HS FOOTBALL Timberline vs. Stadium Stadium Bowl - 7 p.m. FRIDAY, OCT. 17 - HS FOOTBALL Central Kitsap vs. Lincoln Lincoln Bowl - 7 p.m. FRIDAY, OCT. 17 - HS FOOTBALL Wilson vs. Foss Mt. Tahoma Stadium - 7 p.m. FRIDAY, OCT. 17 - HS FOOTBALL Orting vs. Fife Fife Stadium - 7 p.m. FRIDAY, OCT. 17 - HS FOOTBALL White River vs. Washington Franklin Pierce Stadium - 7 p.m. FRIDAY, OCT. 17 - HS FOOTBALL South Bend vs. Chief Leschi Chief Leschi Stadium - 7 p.m. SATURDAY, OCT. 18 - VOLLEYBALL Whitworth vs. Puget Sound UPS Fieldhouse - 5 p.m. SATURDAY, OCT. 18 - HS FOOTBALL North Beach vs. Tacoma Baptist Curtis HS - 7 p.m. SATURDAY, OCT. 18 - HS FOOTBALL Rainier vs. Life Christian Harry Lang Stadium, Lakewood - 7 p.m. FRIDAY, OCT. 24 - HS FOOTBALL Lincoln vs. Wilson Stadium Bowl - 7 p.m. FRIDAY, OCT. 24 - HS FOOTBALL Shelton vs. Mt. Tahoma Mt. Tahoma Stadium - 7 p.m. FRIDAY, OCT. 24 - HS FOOTBALL River Ridge vs. Fife Fife Stadium - 7 p.m. FRIDAY, OCT. 24 - HS FOOTBALL Clover Park vs. Franklin Pierce Franklin Pierce Stadium - 7 p.m. FRIDAY, OCT. 24 - HS FOOTBALL Chief Leschi vs. Tacoma Baptist Curtis HS - 7 p.m. FRIDAY, OCT. 24 - VOLLEYBALL George Fox vs. Pacific Lutheran PLU Fieldhouse - 7 p.m. SATURDAY, OCT. 25 - COLLEGE FOOTBALL Willamette vs. Pacific Lutheran Sparks Stadium, Puyallup - 1 p.m. SATURDAY, OCT. 25 - MEN'S SOCCER Linfield vs. Puget Sound Baker Stadium - 2:30 p.m. SATURDAY, OCT. 25 - MEN'S SOCCER Willamette vs. Pacific Lutheran PLU Soccer Complex - 2:30 p.m. SATURDAY, OCT. 25 - VOLLEYBALL Linfield vs. Pacific Lutheran PLU FIELDHOUSE - 7 p.m. SUNDAY, OCT. 26 - MEN'S SOCCER Willamette vs. Puget Sount Baker Stadium - 2:30 p.m. SUNDAY, OCT. 26 - MEN'S SOCCER Linfield vs. Pacific Lutheran PLU Soccer Complex - 2:30 p.m. Read more...
Wednesday, October 15, 2014 -- 12:20 pm
Sportswatch
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - LUTES BOUNCE BACK WITH 44-7 ROMP OVER LEWIS & CLARK Pacific Lutheran scored touchdowns on each of its first five drives as the 21st-ranked Lutes coasted to a 44-7 Northwest Conference football victory over Lewis & Clark Saturday, Oct. 11 at Griswold Stadium. With the win, PLU improves to 3-1 overall and 1-1 in conference play, while Lewis & Clark falls to 0-5 overall and 0-3 in the NWC. The Lutes will return to Oregon next weekend, when they will travel to Forest Grove to take on Pacific on Oct. 18 at 1 p.m. Dalton Ritchey completed 11 of his 12 pass attempts for 138 yards and four touchdowns and rushed for 71 yards on five carries while playing only five drives for the Lutes. Jon Schaub threw for 87 yards and a touchdown as PLU passers combined to go 20-for-24 on pass attempts for 219 yards and five scores. Kyle Warner caught seven passes for 79 yards and three touchdowns, while Marc Gallant and Beau Lockmer each added scoring catches for PLU. Niko Madison rushed for a game-best 89 yards and a score on only seven carries. On defense, Cody Tupen finished with a pair of sacks and Blake Petersen picked off a pass in the win. The Lutes picked up 29 first downs and 513 yards of total offense, with 294 coming on the ground and 219 coming through the air. Meanwhile the PLU defense limited Lewis & Clark to 12 first downs and only 188 yards of total offense. Jake Constantino rushed for 56 yards and the Pioneer's lone score of the day. PLU built a 35-0 lead midway through the second quarter before Lewis & Clark took advantage of a PLU fumble to score its lone touchdown of the day off a three-play, 32-yard drive. The Lutes followed with a touchdown in the third quarter and added their final points on a fourth-quarter safety when a Pioneer snap sailed over the L&C punter's head and out the back of the end zone. FOLEY SETS UPS RECORD IN HOMECOMING LOSS TO PACIFIC Senior quarterback Braden Foley became Puget Sound's all-time leader in total offense, but the Logger football team lost to Pacific, 44-17, at Baker Stadium during Homecoming and Family Weekend on Saturday, Oct. 11. Foley entered Saturday's contest just 36 yards shy of Andy Carlson's career mark of 5,506 yards of total offense, and the Bothell, Washington, native set the new Puget Sound record early in the first quarter. "I am thankful for the very talented receivers I've had around me, and the great offenses I've played with," said Foley. "It feels good, I'm honored." Foley has accumulated 5,690 yards of total offense during his Puget Sound career. The Loggers (2-2, 1-1 NWC) jumped out to a 17-0 lead, as the scoring started with a 36-yard field goal by Sawyer Petre late in the first quarter. Puget Sound marched down the field to open the second quarter as a 21-yard catch by Dustin Harrison coupled with a personal foul penalty by Pacific (2-2, 2-0 NWC) placed the ball on the Boxers' six-yard line. Following a one-yard rush by Max McGuinn, Foley connected with Par Read more...




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