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Friday, October 24, 2014 -- 9:24 pm
Lincoln clips Wilson in a nail-biter for the 3A Narrows league crown.
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - Full story available at http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ Read more...
Thursday, October 23, 2014 -- 11:56 am
Milton 5k walk/run encourages real life superheroes
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - Over 150 turned out on Oct. 4 to attend "Little Steps, Big Dreams" - local nonprofit Step By Step's 4th annual 5k Walk/Run, raising nearly $30,000 to helpábabies be born healthy and to build strong families in the community.áThe 5k Walk/Run was held in Milton near Puyallup on the Milton Interurban Trail. Event sponsors included CHI Franciscan Health, HomeStreet Bank, and Korum Automotive, among others. This year's event featured an activity for young children affectionately named "The Great Caper," where kids received a free superhero cape (donated in part by SuperflyKids) and were given simple, fun activities to practice being a real superhero by embracing positive character traits such as kindness, helpfulness, and perseverance. "We want to help kids realize that being a superhero is not just about having a superpower or being recognized on a stage. At the heart of every real superhero is a strong character, someone who doesn't give up and who cares about the well being of others," said Krista Linden, Step By Step founder and executive director. While there were prizes for race winners, the event was family focused and largely noncompetitive. The nature of the event is to encourage individuals and families to unplug, to get outside and spend a little quality time with their friends and neighbors, for parents to spend time with their children, and for kids to have fun in an atmosphere that encourages teamwork and positive relationships. "We love that the trail is filled with moms pushing their babies in strollers, kids laughing and playing, and teams walking and talking together. It's a chance to simply enjoy time together in the beautiful outdoors - and for a good cause," Linden said. The idea for this year's event came from the organization's overall mission to help babies be born healthy and their belief that every child has the potential to go on to do great things and should be given a healthy start in life - because even superheroes start out small. Proceeds from the event will go to support Step By Step's maternity support program that helps pregnant women in the community who are facing barriers to health, for mom and/or baby. Step By Step provides relational-based programs and resources to help women, so they will deliver a healthy baby, embrace positive parenting, and establish a safe home for themselves and their children. "Together, we are helping to build stronger and healthier families, neighborhoods, and communities - one mom, one baby, one step at a time." For more information about Step by Step, visit stepbystepnews.org. Read more...
Wednesday, October 22, 2014 -- 2:28 pm
Coming Events
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - TW PICK: Halloween Trunk or Treat Sat. Oct. 25, 2 p.m. LeMay-America's Car Museum, 2702 E. D St. Rain or shine. Enjoy a unique way to trick-or-treat! LeMay Halloween Trunk-or-Treat provides a safe environment for families to enjoy an inexpensive afternoon of Halloween fun in a neat atmosphere! Costumed children (age 12 & under) trick-or-treat outdoors by going from car trunk to car trunk to get their bag filled with goodies. Families, individuals or groups host and decorate a collector car, motorcycle, or hearse (regular driver cars are welcome, too) and provide packaged candy to be given out to the children at the event. There is no charge to participate - the more the merrier! Info: www.lemaymarymount.org/lemay-halloween-trunk-or-treat/ Beautiful Tables Showcase Fri. Oct. 24, 10 a.m. Lakewold Gardens, 12317 Gravelly Lake Dr. SW The Beautiful Tables Showcase is the perfect opportunity to see the colorful fall foliage of the gardens and kick off the holiday season. This is a fabulous time to visit The Wagner House when it is decked out in over 30 themed "beautiful" table settings. This event inspires visitors with creative ideas to continue the tradition of entertaining at home. Price: $10, $15. Info: www.lakewoldgardens.org Wind Ensemble Fri. Oct. 24, 6-7:30 p.m. University of Puget Sound, Schneebeck Concert Hall The Wind Ensemble, directed by Gerard Morris, will perform "Wild Flowers for Winds" featuring works by Bach, Grainger, Hahn, and Wagner. Price: Free, tickets not required. Info: (253) 879-3555 or 'The Haunted Theater: Backstage Tour & Eerie Dances' Sat. Oct. 25, 3 p.m. Merlino Art Center, 508 6th Ave. In celebration of Halloween, Tacoma City Ballet transforms the Tacoma City Ballet School, located in The Merlino Art Center, into The Haunted Theatre: Backstage Tour & Eerie Dances. This family-oriented production has become a cherished Halloween tradition in Tacoma. Price: $5. Info: www.tacomacityballet.com Halloween Skate Party Oct 25, 6-8 p.m. Rollin 253, 2101 Mildred St. W., Fircrest Join the girls from Tacoma All Stars Sports Academy and their families for a fun night of spooky skating. Fun for the entire family. Costumes encouraged but not required - there will be a costume contest. Raffle drawing also for a fun night out. Open to the public. $10 Admission includes skate rental fee. Info: www.facebook.com/TacomaAllStarsSportsAcademy tacomaallstaracademy@gmail.co Celebrate Croatian Heritage Sun., Oct. 26, 2-4 p.m. Slavonian Hall, 2306 N. 30th St. All are invited to attend a free reception to celebrate Croatian heritage in Tacoma. This celebration will include an oral history video presentation of six Croatian elders and members of the lodge, which will portray the significant role of The Slavonian American Benevolent Society in the community and the culture of Tacoma and the Croatian people. The Vela Luka Croatian Dance Ensemble will perform traditional Croatian dances and provide education on Read more...
Wednesday, October 22, 2014 -- 2:17 pm
Nightlife
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - TW PICK OF THE WEEK: Fighting Seasonal Affective Disorder? Trying soaking up the sunny, island reggae vibe Hawaii's Rebel Souljahz plan to bring to Jazzbones on Saturday, Oct. 25. The show will kick off at 8 p.m., and tickets are $20; www.jazzbones.com. Friday, Oct. 24 TACOMA COMEDY: Marc Ryan (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $15 B SHARP COFFEE: Live at the Auricle with Lucas Smiraldo (spoken word) 7 p.m., NC, AA GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Nite Crew (dance) 9 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: Coco Montoya (blues) 8 p.m., $20 KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC LOUIE G'S: The Bomb Shelter CD release (rock) 8 p.m., AA MAXWELL'S: Lance Buller Trio (jazz) 7 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Rockbot (live band karaoke) 9 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Ethan Tucker Band (singer-songwriter) 9 p.m., $5-$10 UNCLE SAM'S: Subvinyl Jukebox (rock covers) 8 p.m., $3-$5 UNCLE THURM'S: Jay Mabin & The Blues Perpetrators (blues) 7:30 p.m., NC, AA Saturday, Oct. 25 BOB'S JAVA JIVE: Battersea, Phobos & Deimos (indie-rock) 9 p.m. B SHARP COFFEE: Dean Reichert (blues) 8 p.m., NC, AA DOYLE'S: Groove Planet (funk) 9:30 p.m., NC GREAT AMERICAN CASINO: Nite Crew (dance) 9 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: Rebel Souljahz (Hawaiian reggae) 8 p.m., $20 KEYS ON MAIN: Dueling pianos, 9 p.m., NC LOUIE G'S: Mechanism, Mom's Rocket, Invasive, $intax (hard rock) 8 p.m., AA NORTHERN PACIFIC: Mister Master, Homeless Man (rock) 7 p.m., AA PANTAGES: Tacoma Symphony Orchestra season opening spectacular (classical) 7:30 p.m., $19-$79 THE SPAR: The Rallies (alt-rock) 8 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Sway (rock) 9 p.m., $5-$10 TACOMA COMEDY: Marc Ryan (comedy) 8, 10:30 p.m., $15 URBAN GRACE: "A Night at the Movies Costume Concert" with Tacoma Youth Symphony and Tacoma Young Artists Orchestra (classical) 7 p.m., $13-$46, AA Sunday, Oct. 26 PANTAGES: The Capitol Steps (political satire) 3 p.m., $19-$69 B SHARP COFFEE: Tacoma Belly Dance Revue, 7 p.m., NC, AA DAWSON'S: Tim Hall Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: 40 Grit (bluegrass jam) 3 p.m., NC THE SPAR: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Marc Ryan (comedy) 8 p.m., $10-$20, 18+ Monday, Oct. 27 NEW FRONTIER: Open mic comedy with Eric "Puddin'" Lorentzen, 9 p.m., NC B SHARP COFFEE: Creative Colloquy (spoken word) 7 p.m., NC, AA GIG SPOT: Monday Mash-Up open mic and trivia, 8 p.m., NC, AA JAZZBONES: Rockaroke (live band karaoke) 11 p.m., NC THE SWISS: Shelly Ely Band (blues) 9 p.m., NC Tuesday, Oct. 28 JAZZBONES: Ha Ha Tuesday with host Ralph Porter (comedy) 8:30 p.m., $5 ANTIQUE SANDWICH CO.: Open mic, 6:30 p.m., $3, AA DAVE'S OF MILTON: Jerry Miller (blues, rock) 7 p.m., NC NEW FRONTIER: Open mic, 7 p.m., NC STONEGATE: Leanne Trevalyan (acoustic open mic) 8 p.m., NC Wednesday, Oct. 29 NORTHERN PACIFIC: Zennith Laenid (indie-rock) 7 p.m., NC, AA DAWSON'S: Linda Myers Band (open jam) 8 p.m., NC JAZZBONES: I Wayne, Black Am I, High Ceiling (reggae) 8 p.m., $10 STONEGATE: Dave Nichols' Hump Day Jam, 8:30 p.m., NC TACOMA COMEDY: Read more...
Wednesday, October 22, 2014 -- 1:42 pm
Musical Political satire group to perform at Pantages
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - The Capitol Steps - the political satire troupe that will headline the Pantages Theater this weekend - has earned a reputation and a place in the comedic world. The troupe began with a group of Senate staffers who set out to satirize the very people that signed their paychecks. They monitor events and personalities on Capitol Hill, in the Oval Office and other centers of power, and take a humorous look at current issues straight from the headlines. They poke fun at both sides of the aisle with up-to-the-minute song parodies, and take jabs at everything from elections to last year's budget sequester, Obama Care, the Supreme Court, gay marriage and every subject in between. The group was born in December 1981, when Republican congressional staffers Elaina Newport, Bill Strauss and Jim Aidala - then working for Sen. Charles Percy - were planning entertainment for a Christmas party. Their first idea was to stage a nativity play, but in the whole Congress they couldn't find three wise men or a virgin. So, they decided to dig into the headlines of the day, and they created song parodies and skits which conveyed a special brand of satirical humor. In the years that followed, many of the Steps ignored the conventional wisdom "Don't quit your day job!". Based in Washington, DC, the troupe has won numerous awards. Although not all of the current members of the Steps are former Capitol Hill staffers, taken together the performers have worked in a total of eighteen Congressional offices and represent 62 years of collective House and Senate staff experience. Some worked for Democrats, some worked for Republicans, and others worked for politicians who firmly straddle the fence. No matter who holds office, there's never a shortage of material. Says Elaina Newport, "Typically, the Republicans goof up, and the Democrats party. Then the Democrats goof up, and the Republicans party. That's what we call the two-party system."á The Capitol Steps will be bringing their hilarious show to Tacoma's historic Pantages Theater onáOct. 26, and they plan to bring down the House - and Senate - with their unique blend of popular music and sharp political satire. The D.C.-based troupe will be poking fun at all sides of the issues, from left to right, with fresh, up-to-the-minute material inspired by the latest headlines, scandals and more. Since they began, the Capitol Steps have recorded over 30 albums, and the current performance will include songs from their latest album, "How to Succeed in Congress Without Really Lying." Sunday's show will kick off at 3 p.m., with tickets available for $19 to $69; www.broadwaycenter.org. Read more...
Wednesday, October 22, 2014 -- 1:36 pm
Barnes storms Pierce College with dynamic paintings
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - Nathan Barnes is a remarkably talented local artist (he now resides in Olympia) relatively new to the party (he just earned his master of fine art degree from Idaho State University in 2012). Look for him to make an impact in the future. The Pierce College Fort Steilacoom Fine Arts Gallery (on the second floor of the Olympic Building) is currently hosting a show of Barnes' work entitled "Open Ended." The show consists of four of Barnes' monumental sized oil paintings. Barnes combines the multiple perspective of cubism with a streamlined representationalism. Figures, objects and landscape are randomly juxtaposed in surreal scenarios that are shot through with lines of energy and inhabited by floating geometric shapes. Often, one object or body is superimposed over another. Use of multiple perspectives is most apparent in "A Partial Conjunction." The upper part of the canvas offers an aerial view of a rocky beach but these stones become weightless as the eye moves toward the middle of the picture space. In the lower portions, the viewer is looking down upon a blonde boy while simultaneously looking up at the underside of a streetlight. Amid the rocks there is a flailing figure whose head is eclipsed by an enlarged portrait of an excited man wearing a green helmet and rose-tinged goggles. A corkscrew of green energy springs out of the rocks. The upside down, thick, pink icing of a cupcake floats with the stones. The whole topsy-turvy scenario is done with crisp clarity. "CNS" is more abstract. Here, an automotive distributor cap floats above an unraveling roll of wrapping paper. The flat, speckled sparkplug wires wrap around the conduits of an electric meter that is set at the foot of a brick wall. The viewer is placed within a long, cosmic tunnel formed by the ribcage of some prehistoric animal. Above is a series of knobs or tools that art not completely painted in. The whole affair is strange and spacey. "Buoyant World" is a long frieze: nine canvas panels joined together in a long, horizontal composition. There are folds of cloth, wrinkled hands, faces superimposed on each other (to disquieting effect), and line drawings of sumo wrestlers. The whole thing is quite a trippy strip. The show's masterwork is "Emergent World," which has been previously exhibited at a show at the Gallery at Tacoma Community College. In this large painting, a factory complex with smoking chimneys is in the background. In the foreground are old tires and 50-gallon drums. The drain screen from a kitchen sink levitates out toward the viewer. Midrange is a bearded homeless man in his grubby clothes pointing towards a girl in a blue dress seated on a stool in a state of ecstasy. Behind her is a mobile home that is partially exploded to expose interior. At the feet of the man sits a dog dressed in a baggy blue jacket. Squiggly tendrils and lines of energy shoot through the enigmatic scene. The works are disturbing and perplexing. Yet the viewer can't help but be impress Read more...
Wednesday, October 22, 2014 -- 1:31 pm
Culture Corner, A Guide to the Museums of Tacoma
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - Museum of the Week: Slater Museum of Natural History University of Puget Sound, 1500 N. Warner St., #1088? Hours: Sept. through May, Wed. and Thurs. 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. (otherwise by appointment) (253) 879-3356, slatermuseum@pugetsound.edu www.pugetsound.edu/academics/academic-resources/slater-museum/ The museum's primary goal is to provide a well-curated collection of specimens to be used for research and education by the communities to which it belongs: the University of Puget Sound, the Puget Sound region, and, in a broad sense, the world. Museums have an ever-increasing responsibility for the conservation of specimens as animal and plant populations are threatened by human activities, and the Slater Museum is one of the region's significant repositories for these specimens. Furthermore, museum collections serve as the primary sources of information about both spatial and temporal aspects of biodiversity anywhere in the world. To accomplish this, the museum will continue to enhance its collections, especially of regional animals and plants, and to search for orphaned collections to preserve. This week's events: Oct. 29, 6-7:30 p.m. Skulls & Skeletons Night at the Museum! Just in time for Halloween, come get up-close and personal with the skeletal side of things! This event will feature the skulls & skeletons of the Slater collection. You can expect to see the tongue bones of a woodpecker, the amazing arms of a bat, the specialized skeleton of flying birds, and the hard outer shell of an armadillo! Come learn about the many forms and functions of the skeleton. Kid's Activity: Come uncover a skeleton in a "paleontology box." Kids can dig for bones and assemble skeletons with the help of Slater volunteers. Live Animals: You can expect a special guest from the Point Defiance Zoo & Aquarium, and learn about their skeletal adaptations. Demonstrations: You can watch Slater volunteers articulating skeletons (which means piecing them together bone by bone into a complete skeleton!). Specimen preparation: As always, our Collections Manager will be turning dead animals into museum specimens. You can ask questions and get hands-on with his dissections and preparations. Visiting Experts: Graduate students from the University of Puget Sound School of Occupational Therapy will present information on how carrying backpacks and purses affects our spines. Also participating: Phi Sigma Biological Honors Society This event is free and family-friendly. Join us at the University of Puget Sound Campus (located at 1500 N. Warner St.) in Thompson Hall room 295. Current Exhibits: Slater Museum of Natural History is a working, interactive laboratory for the study and curation of mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, insects, and plants of the Puget Sound region. Housing more than 75,000 specimens, mostly from Washington, Oregon, and western North America, the museum has become a valued resource for researchers at the university and in Read more...
Wednesday, October 22, 2014 -- 1:18 pm
The Ioannides era of Tacoma Symphony begins this weekend with "Immortal Love"
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - There will be a fresh face behind the podium as Tacoma Symphony Orchestra kicks off its new season the evening of Saturday, Oct. 25, at the Pantages Theater. Sarah Ioannides will make her public debut as incoming music director, conducting TSO as it performs the world premier of Sean O'Boyle's new concerto, "Portraits of Immortal Love." "When somebody dies, you continue loving them forever - that never goes away," Ioannides said recently, speaking with a lilting accent that betrays her British and Australian. "It's got a color, variety and a musical language that is extremely approachable and easy to comprehend," she continued. "It's the sort of piece that draws you in. It's direct and it's clear and it's beautiful in many ways; and it's fun, as well. It's got humor. It's got a lot of character, and he's a great composer. So I think this is going to be an exciting moment for us all." Joining TSO for this weekend's sold-out performance is Grammy-winning, Scottish percussionist Evelyn Glennie. "She is just amazing," Ioannides said. "She's very precise, very dramatic and such a musical talent. She can make one single instrument (produce) a gradual crescendo and, in the middle, get faster and faster and then slow down. The way that she brings her intensity and understanding of simple concepts such as that, it just sort of brings your understanding (of music) to a new level." Ioannides replaces departed music director Harvey Felder, who left Tacoma Symphony last spring after two decades at its helm. Ioannides was born in Australia but grew up in England where she studied French horn, piano and violin. She played with the National Youth Orchestra of Britain as a teenager; but her greatest influence growing up would have been her renowned conductor dad, Ayis Ioannides. "For one, he asked me if I'm really sure about this profession, if I really wanted to do it," she recalled. "(He) actually tried to persuade me not to and to become a violinist. But, when I was obviously sure about it, he was very supportive." Ioannides was assistant conductor of the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra from 2002 to 2004 and the music director for El Paso Symphony Orchestra from 2005 to 2011. She has also served as music director for the Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchestra, in South Carolina, for the past 10 years. She first led Tacoma Symphony during an audition concert in February 2013. The New York Times has hailed her as "a conductor of unquestionable strength and authority," and The Los Angeles Times referred to her as "one of six female conductors breaking the glass podium," a reference to the sexism that still seems to persist in her field. "We are still evolving in our mindset of equality, and it is still gradually becoming accepted as a career that women can pursue," Ioannides said. "I try not to dwell on that kind of thing. I just try to do what I do in the most vibrant and inspiring way, and the best I can as a musician and a conductor. I'm thrilled t Read more...
Wednesday, October 22, 2014 -- 1:11 pm
The Things We Like
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - TRIVIA NIGHT Trivia buffs can test their talents during Pierce County Library's Scout trivia night in Tacoma, 7 p.m. on Oct. 28 at Swiss Restaurant & Pub, 1904 Jefferson Ave. Have fun with a bunch of book nerds, earn a Scout badge for participating and sign up for a free library card. Cost is $2 per person with a seven person maximum for a team. 'DIAL 'M' FOR MURDER' Retired professional tennis star Tony Wendice (Brent Griffith) has married his wife, Margot (Deya Ozburn), for her money and now plans to murder her for the very same reason. He arranges what he believes is the perfect crime aided by Captain Lesgate (Chris Rocco) but watches helplessly as his carefully crafted plan spirals out of control. Opens Oct. 24 at Tacoma Little Theatre. Info: www.TacomaLittleTheatre.com or (253) 272-2281. DANNY GLOVER Danny Glover's appearance at Tacoma's Pantages Theater has been moved to Jan. 25. The actor - best known for appearing in "The Color Purple," "Witness" and, of course, the "Lethal Weapon" series - was originally scheduled to appear on Nov. 1, but the date had to be changed due to a scheduling conflict. Ticket information regarding the new date can be found at www.broadwaycenter.org. TACOMA BUDDHIST TEMPLE Enjoy Japanese foods and browse through an Asian-themed rummage sale at the Tacoma Buddhist Temple Fall Food and Craft Bazaar, 1717 S. Fawcett Ave., on Nov. 2, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. This year's food offerings will feature a mix of crowd favorites, like rice curry and mochi (sweet rice) pastries, and a selection of new items. Diners can eat at the temple or get meals to go. Besides lunch, the event will include a bake sale and a local artwork exhibit and sale. The rummage sale will include dishware, crafts and dÚcor, many of them Asian-themed. Come early before your favorites sell out! Info: Rev. Kojo Kakihara, (253) 627-1417 or . RACHEL CORRIE Tacoma Little Theatre presents the emotional piece "My Name is Rachel Corrie" for one night only, Nov. 6, 7:30 p.m. On March 16, 2003, Corrie, a 23-year-old American, was crushed to death by an Israeli Army bulldozer in Gaza as she was trying to prevent the demolition of a Palestinian home. This one-woman play was composed from her own journals, letters and emails-creating a portrait of a messy, articulate, Salvador Dali-loving chain-smoker (with a passion for the music of Pat Benatar), who left her home and school in Olympia to work as an activist in the heart of Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Tickets are $10 for non-TLT members (free for members) at www.tacomalittletheatre.com or (253) 272-2281. Read more...
Wednesday, October 22, 2014 -- 12:57 pm
Be Warned: there is a Cho in 'Psycho'
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - Margaret Cho has a knack for finding the funny side of adversity. For "I'm the One That I Want" - her breakthrough concert film from 2000 - she revisited the cancellation of her short-lived '90s sitcom, "All American Girl," and struggles with substance abuse and eating disorders that nearly ruined her. Since then, she has become known for an intensely personal, uplifting brand of comedy that confronts conventional notions of race, sex and gender identity. Cho has prepared another raunchy yet thought-provoking set that she will deliver during four big performances at Tacoma Comedy Club on Nov. 4 and 5. Here's what she had to say about the horrific headlines that informed the new material, recording two follow-up CDs to her 2010 musical debut, "Cho Dependent," and what she learned from a recently departed role model. Tacoma Weekly: I was on your blog, and one of the last posts I saw was about going to Joan Rivers' funeral. How much of a role model was she for you? Cho: Oh, she was amazing. I mean, I wanted to be her when I was a kid. To later go on and be friends with her was such an honor. I'm still having problems believing that she's gone. She was the person that I would go to if I had a terrible show. That person's gone now, but maybe that's okay. Maybe that means I've grown up enough to be my own counsel in that way. But she taught me a lot. TW: What sort of advice stands out? Cho: She was really big on gratitude and how we had to be so happy because we were so lucky to do what we did. Comedy is such a great profession, and it's something that you can never be too old to do - you will always work. That was her genius, pointing out where you should be grateful. TW: So what kind of stuff are you riffin' on onstage this time around? Cho: There's so much violence everywhere, and violence against women, and this is a really bad problem, globally. So (the routine is about) trying to find a way to harness all those things we feel and figure it out. You know, it's about the power of being crazy. The show is called "There's No 'I' in Team, but There's a Cho in 'Psycho.'" TW: Are you doing more topical stuff? Cho: Yes, topical, but then it's also ... about feminism and the way that it's perceived, and also the way we can internalize these misogynistic ideals. That's a big problem that, I think, everybody deals with, and it's not topical. That's something that needs to be discussed always. TW: Was there anything in the headlines that especially inspired your material? Cho: In general, it was starting with the girls being kidnapped in Nigeria, that whole Bring Back Our Girls campaign. They're still gone. I think one escaped, so that's still happening. Nobody's really paying attention to it because everybody's freaking out about ISIS, but that's still happening. (She also alludes to Cleveland kidnapper Ariel Castro.) It's that idea of women being held captive over and over again. We're continuing to see it. It's just a very difficult clim Read more...
Wednesday, October 22, 2014 -- 12:38 pm
Rescue Mission presents annual Give Hope Luncheon
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - Tacoma non-profit The Rescue Mission's annual Give Hope Luncheon will take place on Nov.5 from noon-1:30 p.m. at the Hotel Murano. After a record-breaking event in 2013, when the Rescue Mission hosted 350 people and achieved a net gain of $48,000, The Mission is hoping to once again step up their game and double that feat by trying to break $100,000 in donations this year. The event's keynote speaker will be former NFL quarterback and current Lincoln High School coach Jon Kitna. "[Kitna is] donating his time because he's such a passionate guy about at-risk youth. We think this is such a perfect fit," Donor Relations and Community Outreach Liaison Lindsey Jensen said. Jensen hopes the luncheon will provide an opportunity for donors to get a view of what The Rescue Mission is all about, just how many opportunities they provide to volunteers and the many different ways this donation money is put to use. "We want people to know we're a place they can come volunteer whatever their passion is homeless men, veterans, children, we've got opportunities for whatever your passion is," Jensen said. The Mission's two big presenting sponsors this year are Pilkey Hopping and Ekberg Inc. and the Ueland Foundation, each contributing at least $5,000 to the cause. "We are so happy to have [the sponsors]. They have really helped a lot to put this together, giving us a good start," Jensen said. A first this year is a silent auction, open right now and closing Nov. 5, with winners announced at the luncheon, though attendance is not required to claim your prize. Items include a 24-hour Lamborghini rental, a vacation at Mount Whistler and a Seahawks football signed by Richard Sherman. The Rescue Mission is also thinking locally, offering several items that are unique to Tacoma including a trip to the Museum of Glass that includes two "Glass Experience" passes at the Tacoma Glassblowing Studio, two tickets to the Museum, a $100 gift certificate to the Social Bar & Grill, plus two hand-crafted glass pumpkins and a one-of-a-kind swirl bowl. "It's something people can donate to without having to go to the luncheon. Some people can't afford to be a sponsor," Jensen said. Jensen also hopes the event will help business owners network and interact with their peers while enjoying a lunch. "We want this to be a well known business event. We want people to be able to network," Jensen said. "It's an opportunity to hear what we have to say at the event but also be in there with their peers and get some business that way. We want it to be a win-win with our partners and supporters." The Rescue Mission has been a staple in the community for more than 100 years and while many citizens know them for their work with the homeless, Jensen hopes the luncheon will introduce attendees to the wide variety of care they provide for men, women and children in need. "My favorite thing about what I do is sharing with the community what we do. I encourage anyone to come down for a to Read more...
Wednesday, October 22, 2014 -- 12:31 pm
Restaurant Spotlight: Soul
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - Soul and Latin food restaurants often fall into the hole-in-the-wall genre of eateries, with plastic or paper drink holders and paper napkins. Such is decidedly not the case of Soul, a restaurant specializing in the full range of Latin food from Puerto Rican, Cuban, Dominican and Peruvian food. Located at 2717 N. Proctor St., Soul doesn't skimp on the linen napkins and polished flatware. Co owners Natural Allah and Jennifer Zaskorski grew up in New York and pull from that world-knowledge of food to bring flavors of home for veterans to Latin food as well as new experiences to the novice foodies. Signature dishes include catfish and the Jambalaya that is made with fresh chicken, shrimp, hot links and medium-spicy rice that are $15 each. The Jamaican Curry Goat with Coco rice and peas and tostones for $17 also brings smiles whenever it's on the menu, but the real must-eat dish is the Oxtail with Basmati rice, priced at $15. "We get calls daily about that because it sells out fast, and it takes a long time to cook," Zaskorski said. Completing the Latin dining experience often includes Chica from Peru, Cuban coffee and high-end rum deliciousness. The breakfast menu includes fan favorites, Shrimp and Grits, Fried Chicken and Waffles and Huevos Rancheros, all for $14 each. A trans-cultural hit is also the Jalapeno Lox bagel, local salmon lox and homemade pineapple cream cheese on a jalapeno bagel for $8. Soul's most famous offering is their Southern fried chicken, three crisp fried chicken wings or two thighs with your choice of two sides; tostones, amarillos, fried corn, mac and cheese, red beans and rice, sweet potatoes, yellow rice with beans, French fries, mofongo, Caesar salad, potato salad, arroz con gandules or collard greens for $14. "We could win a contest with our greens," Zaskorski, failing to reveal the home secret to the Southern staple. ? While food seekers are welcome to swing by for a bit off Soul's Dine and Dash menu, weekend diners are advised to call in reservations since Soul only seats 46 people, which are routinely filled with birthday and anniversary parties. "During the weekend, you might have to wait a little bit," Zaskorski said, noting that diners often linger for one more Latin drink or side dish and good conversation that come from good meals. Soul is open noon to 8 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays, noon to 10 p.m. on Fridays, 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. on Saturdays and 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Sundays. For more info on Soul, call (253) 761-7685. Read more...
Wednesday, October 22, 2014 -- 12:10 pm
TACOMA'S HOT TICKETS OCT. 24 - NOV. 02
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - FRIDAY, OCT. 24 - HS FOOTBALL Lincoln vs. Wilson Stadium Bowl - 7 p.m. FRIDAY, OCT. 24 - HS FOOTBALL Shelton vs. Mt. Tahoma Mt. Tahoma Stadium - 7 p.m. FRIDAY, OCT. 24 - HS FOOTBALL River Ridge vs. Fife Fife Stadium - 7 p.m. FRIDAY, OCT. 24 - HS FOOTBALL Clover Park vs. Franklin Pierce Franklin Pierce Stadium - 7 p.m. FRIDAY, OCT. 24 - HS FOOTBALL Chief Leschi vs. Tacoma Baptist Curtis HS - 7 p.m. FRIDAY, OCT. 24 - VOLLEYBALL George Fox vs. Pacific Lutheran PLU Fieldhouse - 7 p.m. SATURDAY, OCT. 25 - COLLEGE FOOTBALL Willamette vs. Pacific Lutheran Sparks Stadium, Puyallup - 1 p.m. SATURDAY, OCT. 25 - MEN'S SOCCER Linfield vs. Puget Sound Baker Stadium - 2:30 p.m. SATURDAY, OCT. 25 - MEN'S SOCCER Willamette vs. Pacific Lutheran PLU Soccer Complex - 2:30 p.m. SATURDAY, OCT. 25 - VOLLEYBALL Linfield vs. Pacific Lutheran PLU FIELDHOUSE - 7 p.m. SATURDAY, OCT. 25 - INDOOR SOCCER Seattle Impact vs. Tacoma Stars Tacoma Soccer Center - 7:30 p.m. SUNDAY, OCT. 26 - MEN'S SOCCER Willamette vs. Puget Sount Baker Stadium - 2:30 p.m. SUNDAY, OCT. 26 - MEN'S SOCCER Linfield vs. Pacific Lutheran PLU Soccer Complex - 2:30 p.m. WEDNESDAY, OCT. 29 - WOMEN'S SOCCER Puget Sound .vs. Pacific Lutheran PLU Soccer Complex - 4 p.m. FRIDAY, OCT. 31 - HS FOOTBALL Gig Harbor .vs. Bellarmine Prep Bellarmine HS - 7 p.m. FRIDAY, OCT. 31 - HS FOOTBALL Curtis vs. Stadium Stadium Bowl - 7 p.m. FRIDAY, OCT. 31 - HS FOOTBALL Foss vs. Lincoln Lincoln Bowl - 7 p.m. FRIDAY, OCT. 31 - HS FOOTBALL North Thurston vs. Mt. Tahoma Mt. Tahoma Stadium - 7 p.m. FRIDAY, OCT. 31 - HS FOOTBALL Franklin Pierce vs. Washington Franklin Pierce Stadium - 7 p.m. FRIDAY, OCT. 31 - HS FOOTBALL Fife vs. Clover Park Harry Lang Stadium - 7 p.m. SATURDAY, NOV. 01 - COLLEGE FOOTBALL Pacific Lutheran vs. Puget Sound Baker Stadium - 1 p.m. Read more...
Wednesday, October 22, 2014 -- 11:59 am
SPORTSWATCH
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - LOGGERS STRONG SEASON ROLLS WITH THUMPING OF GEORGE FOX The University of Puget Sound football team scored two touchdowns through the air, one on defense, and one on special teams as the Loggers picked up a Northwest Conference win on the road by beating George Fox, 33-14, on Saturday, Oct. 24 at Baker Stadium. The Loggers (3-2, 2-1 NWC) held a 12-7 lead entering halftime, and neither side scored in the third quarter. However, Puget Sound erupted for 21 points in the fourth quarter. Nasser Abdelrasul returned an interception 78 yards for the touchdown to give the Loggers a 19-7 lead with 12:35 on the clock in the fourth quarter. The Bruins (0-5, 0-3 NWC) remained in striking distance when their ensuing possession resulted in a 40-yard touchdown pass from Grant Schroeder to Brad Lander, cutting Puget Sound's lead to 19-14 with 10:24 on the clock. Connor Savage lined up deep to return the following kickoff for the Loggers, and the junior from Bothell, Washington, sprinted 99 yards for the touchdown, increasing Puget Sound's lead to 26-14. "We have a lot of upperclassmen stepping up to make big plays in crucial situations," said Puget Sound head coach Jeff Thomas. "Nasser's interception and Connor's return show that we can win in several different ways." The Logger defense made a couple of crucial stops late in the fourth quarter, and Braden Foley hit Kevin Miller for a 19-yard touchdown pass for the game's final score with 1:35 on the clock. "Our defense played with amazing mental toughness," said Thomas. "They were able to bounce back from allowing a touchdown in the fourth quarter, and they made big stops down the stretch." Puget Sound grabbed a 6-0 lead in the first quarter after Foley connected with Peter Bell for an 8-yard touchdown pass (the PAT was no good). Sawyer Petre's 20-yard field goal pushed the lead to 9-0 midway through the second quarter, but George Fox reached the end zone on Schroeder's seven-yard touchdown completion to Derek Richwine with 1:41 left in first half. Six completions by Foley during half's final drive set up Petre's 47-yard field goal as time expired, giving the Loggers a 12-7 edge at the break. Puget Sound's third win of the season is the most since 2008, and the Loggers still have four games remaining in 2014. Foley completed 25 of 35 pass attempts for 285 yards and two touchdowns, and Dustin Harrison finished with a game-high 85 receiving yards. On the defensive side of the ball, Matt Gilbert led the Loggers with 10 tackles and Doug Owusu recorded four tackles for a loss and the defensive end also picked up an interception. The Loggers remain on the road when they play at Whitworth on Saturday, Oct. 25. Kickoff is scheduled for 1 p.m. LUTES FOOTBALL DROPS FIRST GAME TO PACIFIC IN 42 YEARS Pacific Lutheran took its first lead of the day midway through the fourth quarter, but Pacific scored on its next drive and the Boxers defeated the 18th-ranked Lutes for the first time since 1972 with a 31-28 No Read more...
Wednesday, October 22, 2014 -- 11:50 am
It's time to start talking about playoffs
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - The high school football regular season is rolling toward its conclusion, and several Tacoma area teams are deep in the hunt for a playoff spot. With just two games remaining before the post-season, we take a look at where several teams stand. BELLARMINE LIONS (4-0 4A Narrows, 6-1 overall) The Lions have put together some gutsy wins this season and sit tied atop the 4A Narrows standings with the Gig Harbor Tides. Bellarmine is already assured of a playoff spot, but faces possibly its two toughest tests of the season with a road game against Olympia on Friday, Oct. 24 and a Halloween home game against the Tides for what will probably be the league championship. The top two seeds in the 4A Narrows will host a home playoff game in the play-in round before the first round of the state playoffs. The third place team will hit the road to face the runner-up from the SPSL North division and the fourth place team will travel to face the champion of the WESCO league and fourth. LINCOLN ABES (5-0 3A Narrows, 7-0 overall) The high-flying fifth-ranked Lincoln Abes have thrived under coach Jon Kitna's tutelage and are also assured of a playoff berth. If the Abes can get past Wilson on Oct. 24 at Stadium Bowl, Lincoln will wrap-up the 3A Narrows crown. If the Abes stumble, the ever-dangerous Foss Falcons await the following week for a Halloween contest at Mt. Tahoma Stadium. The top two seeds in the 3A Narrows will host a home playoff game in the play-in round. The first seed will host the eighth-place finisher from the Metro conference, while the second seed will host fourth place from the WESCO. The third seed will travel to the Metro's fourth place team and the fourth seed travels to the Metro's runner-up. WILSON RAMS (4-1, 6-1) The Rams are in position to finish anywhere within the top-four spots in the 3A Narrows and are virtually assured of their second playoff berth in a row. With a tough test remaining against Lincoln on Oct. 24 and an Oct. 30 contest with potent Central Kitsap, the Rams have their work cut out for them to grab one of the two home-field seeds to the playoffs. CURTIS VIKINGS (4-1 4A SPSL South, 5-2 overall) The Vikings stumbled out of the gate this season, taking some hard losses to Kentwood, Union and Graham-Kapowsin, but have now won three games in a row and sit in second place in the 4A SPSL South. One final league game remains on the schedule and it may be the biggest of the season. Curtis travels to Sparks Stadium in Puyallup to face first-place Emerald Ridge for what may be the league title. With a win against Bethel on Oct. 17, the Vikings secured at least a third seed to into the playoffs. The top two seeds will host a home game in the play-in round on Nov. 7 or 8. FIFE TROJANS (4-1 2A SPSL, 5-2 overall) The Trojans looked to be out of the running for the league title after a tough loss to rival Franklin Pierce on Oct. 10, but the Cardinals were tripped-up by Steilacoom the following week and Fife is back in the runni Read more...
Wednesday, October 22, 2014 -- 11:44 am
Lincoln volleyball unable to quell Shelton momentum
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - The Lincoln Lady Abes put up a good fight Monday, Oct. 13 but were unable to keep up with a determined bunch from Shelton and dropped tough one (24-26), 25-15, (13-25) and (22-25) in 3A Narrows league action at the Lincoln gymnasium on Monday, Oct. 20. The loss draws the two teams even in the Narrows standings at 6-6 and tied for fourth place. Lincoln began the match strong, taking a 10-3 lead in the first game with strong play from Chloe Jones and Asalei Sokimi. From this point, Shelton caught fire and went on a 10-2 run to even the score at 12-12. The two squads traded points to 18-18 and then Lincoln pushed it to 20-18. The Highclimbers kept it tight and caught the Lady Abes at 22-22, 23-23 and 24-24 but scored the final two points on Lincoln miscue into the net and a kill by Shelton's Adrianna Eleton to end game one at 26-24 for Shelton. Game two started as a back-and-forth affair that saw the teams trade points up to 7-7. With Leea Jones taking over service for the Lady Abes, Lincoln took the lead to 12-7. Shelton fired back and went on a 6-3 run to close the score to 15-13. It would be the end of Shelton's momentum as Lincoln ran off a 10-2 run, including a five-point run with Sokimi at the service line and some strong play from Anna McDonald at the net. Lincoln won game two 25-15. Shelton took an early 6-0 lead in the third game, taking advantage of several Lincoln miscues. The Highclimbers were in command for much of the contest keeping the Lady Abes at arm's length and out of contention. Trailing 15-7, Lincoln went on its only run of the game, closing to within four points at 11-15. Shelton kept up the pressure and limited the Lady Abes to just two points the rest of the way to finish game three with the win 25-13. Game four started well for Lincoln as they jumped out to a 5-1 advantage, but saw it disappear with a 7-1 run from the Highclimbers, who took the lead 8-5. Lincoln would climb back in it to tie the game at 11-11, but would never regain the lead as Shelton answered the Lady Abes with a 10-2 run. The Lady Abes still had some gas in the tank and closed to within 22-19 and later 24-22, but a serve into the net ended the game and closed-out the match for Shelton 25-22. The Lady Abes and Highclimbers will meet again in the 3A Narrows league tournament to decide which team will have the fourth or fifth seed to the 3A district tournament. The 3A Narrows is led by the top-ranked and undefeated Capital Cougars. "Our biggest thing all year long is talking and playing with intensity," said Lincoln head coach Steve Johnson. "I'm not worried about the skill. The skill takes care of itself. They've got it. When we talk we become engaged, but when we don't talk we don't become engaged and we don't play nearly as well. I would probably rate this game, as far as the energy level is concerned, at or near the bottom of all our games this year. We're constantly pushing to get to the next level and if things fall the right way for us I certai Read more...
Wednesday, October 22, 2014 -- 11:34 am
Charter changes are too small for the effort but illustrate bigger problems
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - Tacoma operates under a city charter that serves as its municipal constitution. It outlines who has authority over what and when that authority must change hands. A roster of charter changes in 2004 included a mandate at the charter be reviewed every 10 years to keep the city's driving document current with state law and reflects the will of its residents. Charter changes must be approved by voters, after all. Months of often heated hearings, presentations and more hearings and presentations by the council-approved Charter Review Committee brought 21 recommended changes for consideration. Only a dozen were deemed worthy enough by the City Council to forward to voters on Nov. 4. None of the changes are particularly controversial. Certainly none of them have drawn as much political heat as the committee's divided recommendation for the city to shift from its current city manager-council form of government to one that would have a Chief Executive Officer directly answering to a full-time mayor with oversight by the council. That recommendation didn't pass the council's political sniff test to even go to a public vote. With that plan off the table, the remaining 12 charter changes would leave the city's prime document largely unchanged. Charter Amendment 1 would bring the city's election process in line with state law, something that it already does but must still be codified into the charter. Charter Amendment 2 would swap sex-specific language for gender-neutral words. Proposed change 3 would add sexual orientation and veteran status to the city's anti-discrimination codes. Amendment 4 would allow the council to enact emergency ordinances immediately rather than after notice of a new rule is published in legal notices. Amendment 5 would require councilmatic conformation of department heads, while Amendment 6 would require council review of the director of the city-owned Tacoma Public Utilities. Amendment 7 would require the city to have a Landmarks Preservation Commission, something the city already has. Amendment 8 would extend the term limits of council members and the mayor with a cap of 10 years plus two terms as mayor rather than a flat term of service of a decade. This is meant to correct the ongoing issue caused by the staggered four-year council terms and the mayoral election cycle. Amendment 9 would establish a commission to set the salaries for elected officials. Amendment 10 would lift a city-wide ban on new cemeteries, something not likely to come anyway. Amendment 11 would allow city workers to participate in conservation efforts available to the general public and Amendment 12 would remove city residency as a condition of municipal employment. There just isn't anything among the proposed charter changes that grabs much attention or raise eyebrows in voters. The fact that there is a coordinated political effort to reject all of the charter amendments out of protest of the entire review process shows that there are clearly Read more...
Wednesday, October 22, 2014 -- 11:29 am
Guest Editorial: Reject attack on Tacoma's council-manager system
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - There's nothing like a proposal to mess with the form of city government to start a big civic fight in Tacoma. And that's what we've got now as voters decide on 12 proposed Tacoma City Charter amendments on the Nov. 4 ballot. True, there is no strong mayor proposal before the voters this time, although that's what the Charter Review Commission recommended before the City Council belatedly pulled the plug on the idea. But make no mistake about it. The council-manager form of government that has served the city well for 62 years is under attack. Four of the proposed amendments - Proposals No. 5, No. 6, No. 8 and No. 9 - would disrupt the careful and fundamental balance of power prescribed in the current charter. These changes would shift more power to the City Council, reduce the historic independence of city-owned Tacoma Public Utilities, undercut the executive authority of the city manager, and open the door to paying part-time council members close to full-time salaries. None of these changes is wise or necessary. None of the four seems warranted by any notable crisis in city government. That's not to say everything's perfect, but city government by most accounts is working well. "Accountability" is the buzzword used by more-power-to-the council proponents. There's plenty of accountability in the current system. The council can, and has, fired city managers. The council has appointed or reappointed 11 Utility Board members in the past 10 years. The city manager can - and has - fired department heads for mistakes or poor performance. Still, council members want more power - without explaining how those who live and work in the city would benefit. More on the four most troublesome amendments: Proposal No. 5 would require council confirmation of city department heads. If the city manager can't independently choose his own management team, he's not really in charge. This negates the purpose of having a council-manager form of government. Proposal No. 6 would require council confirmation of the TPU director's appointment and require reconfirmation every two years. The charter gives the Utility Board - whose members are appointed by the mayor and confirmed by the council - the sole authority to hire and fire the director. This separation of powers is designed to keep political influence out of utility operations. Yet the council retains considerable authority by having final approval of the TPU budget and rate increases. Keeping the chief utility executive on such a short political leash with two masters is a prescription for organizational disaster. If this amendment passes, look for more attempts by the council to shift some costs of general government to utility ratepayers - a maneuver the council has unsuccessfully tried at least twice in recent years. Proposal No. 8 would change the current term limits for the council in such a way that a two-term council member could be elected mayor and serve a total of 18 years altogether. That's Read more...
Wednesday, October 22, 2014 -- 9:59 am
Reception planned for remodeled Washington Elementary School open house
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - Full story available at http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ Read more...
Wednesday, October 22, 2014 -- 9:58 am
Another big win putsáLincolnáone step fromáNarrowsátitle
http://www.tacomaweekly.com/ - The Lincoln Abes put together another solid performance to defeat the visiting Central Kitsap Cougars at historic Lincoln Bowl on homecoming night by a score of 41-14. The Oct. 17 victory moves the fifth-ranked Abes to 5-0 in the 3A Narrowsáleague and 7-0 overall. A win against Wilson (4-1, 6-1) Friday, Oct. 24, at Stadium Bowl would lock up the title foráLincoln. Expect a serious ballgame from Wilson, who still has a chance at the title and is battling for one of the coveted top two seeds out of the 3A Narrows, which will earn a home game for the play-in round of the state playoffs. Junior Lincoln quarterback Jordan Kitna continued his assault through the air, racking up 367 yards passing on 22 of 36 attempts for five touchdowns and an interception. Kitna has now passed for 37 touchdowns this season and is approaching 3,000 yards. Kitna had his leg rolled-up on a sack early in the second quarter and injured his ankle. Lincoln staff taped him up and worked him through a painful remainder of the game before handing the ball off to back-up quarterback, sophomore Joey Sinclair in the fourth quarter. Junior running back Dionte Simon had a big night with 131 yards receiving and two touchdowns. Senior all-everything back Dehonta Hayes scored two touchdowns and set up the first score of the night with a 73-yard punt return. Lincolnágot on the board early working with a short field at the 17-yard line. An 11-yard pass to junior tight end Devin Brady put the Abes at the six-yard line and Kitna followed it up with another strike to Brady on the next play for a touchdown withá9:11áremaining in the first quarter.áLincolnáled 7-0. TheáLincolnádefense heldáCentral Kitsapáto a three and out on the next possession and the Abes took over at their own 40-yard line. Nine plays later Kitna found Simon open in up the middle for a short-gain and the junior did the rest. Meeting Cougar defenders at the three-yard line, Simon was stopped momentarily and then lowered his head and bull-rushed his way across the goal line for a 5-yard touchdown. The Abes now led 13-0 withá6:00áremaining in the second quarter. The Cougars next series stalled at midfield and the two teams traded the ball off for the next five possessions beforeáLincolnágot the ball back on its own 19-yard line. Simon caught another short pass and ran it out to the 38-yard line. On the next play, Kitna hit Simon again for a quick strike and Simon was off to the races for a 62-yard touchdown.áLincolnáled 20-0 withá5:18áremaining in the second quarter. After a fumble by the Cougars, followed by a Kitna interception,áCentral Kitsap took over on its own 26-yard line. Seven plays later, quarterback Kaleb Bates found receiver Kelsey Deer in the back right corner of the end zone and the Cougars were on the scoreboard.áLincolnánow led 20-7 with 36-seconds remaining in the second quarter. The two teams went nowhere on the first two series of the second half and then Lincolnátook over at its own ten-yard line. Read more...




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